Generic conventions

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    08-Apr-2017

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<p>GENERIC CONVENTIONS</p> <p>GENERIC CONVENTIONSMEGAN SHERATON</p> <p>In every front cover for KERRANG! They all have a dominant image on the front that covers the KERRANG! Title to emphasize that the artists are bigger than the main magazine company. Also in every magazine their color schemes all match they only ever use around three or four colors throughout the full front cover which will then be carried on through the full magazine. The layout of the front covers are very similar to where they place extra information or extra photographs etc, to keep the reader interested about reading on. KERRANG! Try to keep their readers informed of what to expect throughout the magazine by cramming everything onto the front page in a messy, rock like style to fit the magazine theme. </p> <p>2</p> <p>In every KERRANG! Magazine contents page, they keep the layout the same with a dominant image at the top half of the page while keeping the actual page numbers and main information towards the bottom of the page to keep the reader interested. They use the exact same color schemes all throughout every contents page, to make it identifiable as KERRANG if any of the pages got separated etc. They also include an editors post in every left hand column to make it more personal for the reader as it gives them information about the editor and why they have written the articles in this way. </p> <p>In almost every KERRANG magazine their double page spreads have their dominant images on the left hand side with the article on the right hand side to decipher exactly who the articles were written about. The colour schemes once again are similar to the front covers and contents pages with the simple three or four different colours, to grab the readers immediate attention and get them to read the actual article. They make the most important information or quotes etc in a bold colour to stand out from the rest of the article or to cover the dominant images, to catch the readers eye and make them think they want to know why that was said. </p>