Информационно-обучающая среда в школьных библиотеках : курс действий

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<p>Assessing School Library Learning Environments</p> <p>- : - : , 21 -, 28 2013 .</p> <p> . . -1</p> <p>- - Baron, Ledbetter, Bishop, &amp; Schultz-Jones2 - (PYP): (MYP): (IBO): May 28, 2013</p> <p> - - -- , , (Fraser, 1998, c.3).</p> <p>Baron, Ledbetter, Bishop, &amp; Schultz-JonesMay 28, 20133The purpose of learning environments research is to allow students to describe their perceptions of and preferences for the interactions among the students, teachers and curriculum.</p> <p>This study employed learning environment research to assess students perceptions of their learning context.Theoretically it was grounded on the constructivist point of view that learning environments are individual constructions (Tobin and Fraser 1998, 626) which are neither independent from, nor external to their participants (Lorsbach and Basolo 1998). Lorsbach and Basolo state that students and teacher simultaneously contribute to the creation of their learning environment, they interact within it and individually perceive it as observers. This view emphasizes the importance of student and teacher perceptions in the study of learning environments. These perceptions reflect ones personal interpretation and beliefs of the degree to which the physical and social setting of a class permits or hinders learning. </p> <p>The aspect of learning environment research, which focuses on conceptualizing, assessing and investigating how classroom participants perceive the socio/psychological aspects of their learning environment, has received significant attention the past 30 years and has been used to evaluate educational reforms. (Dryden and Fraser 1998; Taylor, Fraser and Fisher 1997). </p> <p>Learning Environment (LE)More than the social atmosphere described by external observersParticipants create it, interact within it and perceive itInfluenced by class cultureLearning Environment researchReveals social, psychological and pedagogical aspects of the learning contextHas been used to evaluate educational innovations </p> <p> - ( ) / 40- Baron, Ledbetter, Bishop, &amp; Schultz-JonesMay 28, 20134The purpose of learning environments research is to allow students to describe their perceptions of and preferences for the interactions among themselves, librarians, and curriculum.</p> <p>This study employed learning environment research to assess students perceptions of their learning context.Theoretically it was grounded on the constructivist point of view that learning environments are individual constructions (Tobin and Fraser 1998, 626) which are neither independent from, nor external to their participants (Lorsbach and Basolo 1998). Lorsbach and Basolo state that students and teacher simultaneously contribute to the creation of their learning environment, they interact within it and individually perceive it as observers. This view emphasizes the importance of student and teacher perceptions in the study of learning environments. These perceptions reflect ones personal interpretation and beliefs of the degree to which the physical and social setting of a class permits or hinders learning. </p> <p>The aspect of learning environment research, which focuses on conceptualizing, assessing and investigating how classroom participants perceive the socio/psychological aspects of their learning environment, has received significant attention the past 30 years and has been used to evaluate educational reforms. (Dryden and Fraser 1998; Taylor, Fraser and Fisher 1997). </p> <p>Learning Environment (LE)More than the social atmosphere described by external observersParticipants create it, interact within it and perceive itInfluenced by class cultureLearning Environment researchReveals social, psychological and pedagogical aspects of the learning contextHas been used to evaluate educational innovations </p> <p> - , - . </p> <p>Baron, Ledbetter, Bishop, &amp; Schultz-JonesMay 28, 20135The purpose of learning environments research is to allow students to describe their perceptions of and preferences for the interactions among the students, teachers and curriculum.</p> <p>This study employed learning environment research to assess students perceptions of their learning context.Theoretically it was grounded on the constructivist point of view that learning environments are individual constructions (Tobin and Fraser 1998, 626) which are neither independent from, nor external to their participants (Lorsbach and Basolo 1998). Lorsbach and Basolo state that students and teacher simultaneously contribute to the creation of their learning environment, they interact within it and individually perceive it as observers. This view emphasizes the importance of student and teacher perceptions in the study of learning environments. These perceptions reflect ones personal interpretation and beliefs of the degree to which the physical and social setting of a class permits or hinders learning. </p> <p>The aspect of learning environment research, which focuses on conceptualizing, assessing and investigating how classroom participants perceive the socio/psychological aspects of their learning environment, has received significant attention the past 30 years and has been used to evaluate educational reforms. (Dryden and Fraser 1998; Taylor, Fraser and Fisher 1997). </p> <p>Learning Environment (LE)More than the social atmosphere described by external observersParticipants create it, interact within it and perceive itInfluenced by class cultureLearning Environment researchReveals social, psychological and pedagogical aspects of the learning contextHas been used to evaluate educational innovations </p> <p> - 2013 . - .Baron, Ledbetter, Bishop, &amp; Schultz-JonesMay 28, 20136The purpose of learning environments research is to allow students to describe their perceptions of and preferences for the interactions among the students, teachers and curriculum.</p> <p>This study employed learning environment research to assess students perceptions of their learning context.Theoretically it was grounded on the constructivist point of view that learning environments are individual constructions (Tobin and Fraser 1998, 626) which are neither independent from, nor external to their participants (Lorsbach and Basolo 1998). Lorsbach and Basolo state that students and teacher simultaneously contribute to the creation of their learning environment, they interact within it and individually perceive it as observers. This view emphasizes the importance of student and teacher perceptions in the study of learning environments. These perceptions reflect ones personal interpretation and beliefs of the degree to which the physical and social setting of a class permits or hinders learning. </p> <p>The aspect of learning environment research, which focuses on conceptualizing, assessing and investigating how classroom participants perceive the socio/psychological aspects of their learning environment, has received significant attention the past 30 years and has been used to evaluate educational reforms. (Dryden and Fraser 1998; Taylor, Fraser and Fisher 1997). </p> <p>Learning Environment (LE)More than the social atmosphere described by external observersParticipants create it, interact within it and perceive itInfluenced by class cultureLearning Environment researchReveals social, psychological and pedagogical aspects of the learning contextHas been used to evaluate educational innovations </p> <p> / </p> <p> .</p> <p>Baron, Ledbetter, Bishop, &amp; Schultz-JonesMay 28, 2013: () ? ? ? ?Baron, Ledbetter, Bishop, &amp; Schultz-JonesMay 28, 2013: 7 Baron, Ledbetter, Bishop, &amp; Schultz-JonesMay 28, 2013</p> <p>: ( ): , . (): , . ( ): . (): , . </p> <p>Baron, Ledbetter, Bishop, &amp; Schultz-JonesMay 28, 2013: ( ): , . (): . ( ): , .</p> <p>Baron, Ledbetter, Bishop, &amp; Schultz-JonesMay 28, 2013 </p> <p>Baron, Ledbetter, Bishop, &amp; Schultz-Jones- . . 3 = 2 = 1 = May 28, 201312Dependent samples t-test on means for each of the LE dimensions. In cases where sample sizes were fewer than 20 participants, Wilcoxons T was used. Data were analyzed by grade level and gender. Used Cohens d to establish effect sizes for significant results. : , , , , , , 3- 4- , 5- 7- , Baron, Ledbetter, Bishop, &amp; Schultz-JonesMay 28, 201313 </p> <p>Baron, Ledbetter, Bishop, &amp; Schultz-Jones . . 5 = 4 = 3 = - May 28, 20132 = 1 = 14</p> <p>: , , , , , 6- , , 7- 8- , , , , , , .Baron, Ledbetter, Bishop, &amp; Schultz-JonesMay 28, 20131516Baron, Ledbetter, Bishop, &amp; Schultz-Jones - , </p> <p>May 28, 2013 ??</p> <p>?</p> <p>?Baron, Ledbetter, Bishop, &amp; Schultz-JonesMay 28, 2013 , , , , 76203-5017Benjamin.Baron@unt.edu . , , , 75080-0688ledbetter@utdallas.edu Baron, Ledbetter, Bishop, &amp; Schultz-Jones , - John.bishop@aas.ru </p> <p> -, o , , , 76203-5017Barbara.Schultz-Jones@unt.edu May 28, 2013Fraser, B. J. (1998). The Birth of a new journal: Editor's introduction. Learning Environments Research, 1(1), 1-5. Lorsbach, A. W., &amp; Basolo, J. (1998). Collaborating in the evolution of a middle school science learning environment. Learning Environments Research, 1(1), 115-127. Tobin, K., &amp; Fraser, B. J. (1998). Qualitative and quantitative landscapes of classroom learning environments. In B. J. Fraser and K. G. Tobin (eds.), The international handbook of science education. Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 623-640.</p> <p>19Baron, Ledbetter, Bishop, &amp; Schultz-JonesMay 28, 2013</p>

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