AMR July August 2014

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Asia Pacific's largest circulated defence magazine

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  • www.asianmilitaryreview.com

    VOLUME 22/ISSUE 4 JULY/AUGUST 2014 US$15

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    INFANTRY WEAPONSFRIGATES & DESTROYERSAIRBORNE EARLY WARNINGSATCOM

    UNMANNED SURFACE VEHICLES

    AIR DEFENCEUAV DIRECTORY

    UNMANNED SURFACE VEHICLES

    AIR DEFENCEUAV DIRECTORY

    INFANTRY WEAPONSFRIGATES & DESTROYERSAIRBORNE EARLY WARNINGSATCOM

    COVER July-Aug 14:AMR 6/30/14 3:22 PM Page 1

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  • JULY/AUGUST 2014VOLUME 22 / ISSUE 4

    ContentsContents

    Front Cover Photo:The open nose of a LockheedMartin F-16C/D Fighting Falconmulti-role combat aircraftshowing its Raytheon AdvancedCombat Radar with which it isequipping the same aircraft ofthe Republic of Korea Air Force,as this months Pulse columnexplains RACR (Raytheon)

    Shipshape AndBristol FashionUK-based naval affairs journalistEdward Hooton takes adetailed look at the myriad ofdevelopments in the frigate anddestroyer procurement and upgrademarkets in the Asia-Pacific.

    26

    I Can See For Miles And MilesAsian Military Review editor Thomas Withington takes the temperature of theglobal Airborne Early Warning market and finds it to be in good health, withdemand particularly strong in the Asia-Pacific region.

    14

    Brothers In ArmsThe optical and armamenttechnologies available forinfantry troops are moving at afast pace with numerous newtechnologies equipping thesoldier, as United Kingdom-based defence journalistPeter Donaldson finds out.

    50

    58

    Keeping A Low ProfileSatellite Communications providenew capabilities for military vehicles,enabling them handle large quanti-ties of communications traffic at vastdistances, as Asian Military Revieweditor Thomas Withington explains.

    64

    Pushing The Boat OutUnited Kingdom-based defencejournalist Claire Apthorpexplores the Unmanned SurfaceVehicles domain and discoverssome interesting developmentsin the Asia-Pacific.

    20

    We Are The RobotsBianca Siccardi, an aviationjournalist based in Italy, outlinessome of the recent developments inthe world of Unmanned AerialVehicles (UAVs) in the Asian MilitaryReviews annual UAV Directory.

    33

    Sanitising The SkiesRetired United States NavyCaptain and Louisiana baseddefence journalist Marty Kauchakdelves into the world ofmedium-range ground-basedair defence to uncoversome interesting programmesin the Asia-Pacific.

    Thomas Withington, AMRs editor, provides a digest of the latest developmentsin the military radar, communications and electronic warfare domains.

    06PULSE

    l JULY/AUGUST 2014 l 03

    Content & Edit July-Aug 14:AMR 6/30/14 5:21 PM Page 3

  • Editor: Thomas WithingtonTel: (33) 562 271 697, E-mail: t_withington@hotmail.com

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    AAuuddiitt BBuurreeaauu ooff CCiirrccuullaattiioonnss

    Editorial

    Tony Blair, the United Kingdoms formerprime minister and a key supporter of theUnited States-led 2003 military operation toremove dictator Saddam Hussein and hisregime from its control of Iraq declared in mid-June 2014 that it was absurd toblame the actions of the US-led coalition in ousting Mr. Hussein as responsible forcreating the current crisis in Iraq. The latest twist of this countrys unhappy historyhas seen the ISIS (Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant) Islamist insurgent groupmake significant territorial gains in northwestern Iraq and eastern Syria. The advance of ISIS reached crisis point in June 2014 as the movements armed militias occupied several major Iraqi cities and appeared to be threatening the capital Baghdad. Despite training and mentoring from the US armed forces, and the provision of advanced defence equipment, the Iraqi armed forces, particularly thearmy, has shown itself to be unable to prevent the rapid advanced of ISIS. Mr. Blairs comments were greeted with widespread disbelief in the UnitedKingdom. Claire Short, a former minister for international development in Mr. Blairscabinet condemned his comments as consistently wrong, wrong, wrong. Such condemnations may have been a factor prompting Mr. Blair to pen an editorial in theFinancial Times on 22 June 2014 in which he argued that; the Iraq of 2014 bears, inpart, the imprint of the removal of Saddam Hussein eleven years ago.It seems to your editor that the decision to disband the Iraqi military and the countrys security apparatus in May 2003 by the Coalition Provisional Authority(CPA), the caretaker government of Iraq following the removal of Mr. Hussein misguided at best, and cavalier at worst. This action created a security vacuum thatCoalition troops were never able to fully fill. Undoubtedly a very significant numberof individuals within the security apparatus had blood on their hands as a result ofyears of Mr. Husseins murderous rule, but the CPAs main priority after the invasion should have been to establish law and order. Arrests and prosecutions ofthose responsible for state-sponsored killing and torture should have occurred oncethe security situation stabilised, much as they did in Germany following the end ofthe Second World War. This security vacuum has brought widespread lawlessness which has allowed sectarian hatred, organised crime and corruption to flourish. Iraqi civilians, whomhave been slain in their thousands since 2003, must now face the prospect of morebloodshed unless the ISIS can be stopped. Mr. Blair said in March 2003, on the eveof the invasion of Iraq, that he was prepared to be judged by history, regardingthe rights and wrongs of his decision to support the removal of Saddam Hussein.Ten years after the invasion of Iraq, history appears to be teaching Tony Blair some hard lessons.

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    Editorial

    04 l ASIAN MILITARY REVIEW l

    Index of AdvertisersAMR DIGITAL 32AVALON 41CASSIDIAN 5EMBRAER 9EURONAVAL 77GENERAL ATOMICS 39GSA SINGAPORE 73IDEAS PAKISTAN 55IDEX 57IMDEX SINGAPORE 63INDO DEFENCE 49L3 MMA 13L3 WECAM 35LAAD BRAZIL 75LAND FORCES AUSTRALIA COVER 3LIMA MALAYSIA 71LOCKHEED MARTIN COVER 2MAN DIESEL 11NARDA 7NORTHROP GRUMMAN 45RAYTHEON COVER 4SAAB 25SEOUL AIRSHOW 69TEXTRON 19THYSSENKRUPP 29TRIJICON 53ZHUHAI AIRSHOW 67

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    Content & Edit July-Aug 14:AMR 6/30/14 5:21 PM Page 4

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  • l ASIAN MILITARY REVIEW l06

    PULSEbbyy Thomas Withington

    RadarSaab unveiled a host of new radars during apresentation at the headquarters of the compa-nys radar business in Gothenburg, on the westcoast of Sweden on 12 May 2014. The new radarsare using Gallium Nitride (GaN) technology fortheir semiconductors. This material is particularlygood at tolerating high levels of transmit poweramplification and heat which, in performanceterms, equates to longer radar detection ranges andan improved ability to see small targets.

    The firm launched several new products in the S-band (2.3-2.5/2.7-3.7 gigahertz/GHz), C-band (5.25-5.925GHz) and X-band (8.5-10.68GHz) frequencies.We believe that these new products will give usthe most complete radar portfolio in the world,says Anders Linder, the companys vice presi-dent and head of its surface radar solutionsbusiness unit. Saabs new S-band family ofradars includes the Giraffe-4A and Giraffe-8A ground-based air surveillance, and theSea Giraffe-4A naval surveillance systems.The Giraffe-4A is a true multifunctionradar, according to Mr. Linder, perform-ing air surveillance, weapons location andsense-and-warn functions. This radar pro-vides three-dimensional air surveillanceusing 15 stacked beams which provide up

    to 70 degrees of elevation surveillance. In air search mode, theradar has a range of up to 151 nautical miles (280 kilometres),whereas in weapons location mode it can detect targets at 54nm(100km) range. Up to 1000 tracks can be monitored by the radarin air surveillance mode while, when performing weapons loca-tion, circa 100 targets per minute can be monitored. The Giraffe-8A can perform air surveillance and ground-based air defence. InX-band, the firm has launched the Giraffe-1X which it dubs a typ-ical short-range air defence radar which can be mounted on afour-wheel drive vehicle. It can be used for camp protectionagainst rocket, artillery and mortar fire. With a range of 40nm(70km) the Giraffe-1X can monitor up to circa 100 air targets orcirca 200 surface targets. Using twelve stacked beams, this radarprovides elevation coverage of 70 degrees.

    In the naval domain, the new Sea Giraffe-1X is a three-dimen-sional Active Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) radar per-forming surface detection and air surveillance, and is intended forsmall naval combatants given its antenna size of around onesquare metre (ten square feet). With a range of 54nm (100km), theSea Giraffe-1X can monitor circa 100 air targets and 200 surfacetargets. Meanwhile, the new Sea Giraffe-AMB is a three-dimen-sional, C-band radar which can perform medium-range air andsurface surveillance. It has an instrumented range of 97nm(180km) and can monitor around 200 air targets and up to 400 sur-

    face targets, offering 70 degrees of elevation. Finally theSea Giraffe-4A 3D radar has a AESA antenna and hasbeen purchased, with deliveries expected to com-mence in the 2016, although Saab declined to namecustomers for the radar. In terms of performance,the Sea Giraffe-4A has a range of 189nm (350km)and 70 degrees elevation coverage. Moreover,both the Giraffe-1X and Sea Giraffe-1X are readyfor delivery in the 2016 timeframe, and the com-pany is currently seeking customers. Likewise,the Giraffe-8A is in industrialisation and couldbe delivered from 2017. In April 2014, the Republic of Korea (RoK)

    announced its intention to purchase up to ten airsurveillance radars to provide low-altitude cover-age for the detection of Unmanned AerialVehicles (UAVs), according to local pressreports. The reports added that the countryis expected to spend up to $191 million onthe acquisition. The RoK governmenthopes to finalise the purchase by the end of2014, with a view to the deployment ofthe radars from 2015. Although the gov-ernment is yet to commit to a specificradar type, local media reports specifiedthat RoK officials had visited Israel appar-ently expressing an interest in that coun-trys RADA Electronics RPS-42 S-band

    Saab has made sales of its Sea Giraffe-4A navalsurveillance radar, which is one of a host of newradar products launched by the company in May2014. Deliveries of this radar are expected tocommence in 2016, although the customer hasnot been named Saab

    Alongside the Sea Giraffe-4A, another of the new productslaunched by Saab in May 2014 is the Giraffe-1X mobile airsurveillance radar which can perform the tactical detection of airtargets as well as hostile rocket, artillery and mortar fire Saab

    Pulse:AMR 6/30/14 3:27 PM Page 2

  • (2.3-2.5/2.7-3.7 gigahertz) surveillance radar as a possible solution tothis requirements. The RPS-42 can detect aerial targets at up to 30000feet (9144 metres) altitude at a range of circa 16nm (30km). Coverageis achieved using four individual plates mounted in such a fashion soas to deliver 90 degrees of azimuth and 80 degrees of elevation cover-age using AESA antennae.

    Looking towards Europe, the Aeronautica Militare (Italian AirForce) will declare the Initial Operational Capability for its new CARS(Combined Air Operations Centre, Air Operations Centre, RecognisedAir Picture Production Centre and Sensor Fusion Post) located atPoggio Renatico air base in northeast Italy by the end of 2014, accord-ing to Colonel Arturo Cattel, commander of the Italian Air OperationCentre at the joint Italian Air Force/North Atlantic TreatyOrganisation (NATO) base. Col. Cattel was...