Benjamin O. Davis, Jr.: Americanby Benjamin O. Davis

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<ul><li><p>Benjamin O. Davis, Jr.: American by Benjamin O. DavisReview by: Gaaddis SmithForeign Affairs, Vol. 70, No. 3 (Summer, 1991), p. 170Published by: Council on Foreign RelationsStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20044854 .Accessed: 15/06/2014 04:42</p><p>Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms &amp; Conditions of Use, available at .http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp</p><p> .JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range ofcontent in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new formsof scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org.</p><p> .</p><p>Council on Foreign Relations is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to ForeignAffairs.</p><p>http://www.jstor.org </p><p>This content downloaded from 185.2.32.58 on Sun, 15 Jun 2014 04:42:17 AMAll use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions</p><p>http://www.jstor.org/action/showPublisher?publisherCode=cfrhttp://www.jstor.org/stable/20044854?origin=JSTOR-pdfhttp://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsphttp://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp</p></li><li><p>170 FOREIGN AFFAIRS </p><p>1950s?entertainment, churches, schools. Older readers will remember and still be amazed; younger ones will find this a readable introduction to a bizarre aspect of the American past. </p><p>BENJAMIN O. DAVIS, JR.: AMERICAN. By Benjamin O. Davis, Jr. Washington: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1991, 442 pp. $19.95. </p><p>General Davis was the first black to graduate from West Point in this </p><p>century (1936). He retired as a lieutenant general in the Air Force after a </p><p>distinguished career. This moving autobiography, written with under stated passion and without rancor, describes the appalling ostracism the author endured as a cadet and young officer and the positive changes after </p><p>World War II that opened opportunity to all officers with diminished </p><p>regard to race. </p><p>THE CARDINAL IN THE CHANCERY AND OTHER RECOLLEC TIONS. By Alfred Puhan. New York: Vantage Press, 1990, 228 pp. $16.95. </p><p>Born in Germany in 1913, Ambassador Puhan came to the United States as a youth, played an important role in Voice of America radio broadcasts to Germany during World War II, and in 1952 joined the foreign service. </p><p>He served as ambassador to Hungary, 1969-73. The title of this entertain </p><p>ing memoir refers to Joszef Cardinal Mindszenty's awkward residence in </p><p>the American embassy at that time. </p><p>The Western Hemisphere Abraham F. Lowenthal </p><p>CHILE AND THE UNITED STATES: EMPIRES IN CONFLICT. By William F. Sater. Athens (GA): University of Georgia Press, 1991, 249 pp. $30.00 (paper, $15.00). </p><p>An interesting overview of the contentious history of U.S.-Chilean relations. Sater argues that Chile in the early nineteenth century saw itself as a political and economic equal and as a cultural superior; thus much of Chile's relationship with the United States over the past century must be </p><p>understood in terms of its efforts to cope with the obviously greater success </p><p>of the United States. At a time when Chile seems prepared to be the United </p><p>States' closest South American partner, this history is a useful reminder </p><p>that "Chile and the United States still entertain expectations of the other, </p><p>expectations that neither nation can fulfill." </p><p>ELUSIVE FRIENDSHIP: A SURVEY OF U.S.-CHILEAN RELATIONS. </p><p>By Heraldo Mu?oz and Carlos Portales. Boulder (CO): Reinner, 1991, 109 </p><p>pp. $22.00. Chile's current ambassador to the Organization of American States and </p><p>the director general of Chile's Foreign Ministry wrote this history of </p><p>Chilean-U.S. relations, focusing primarily on the Pinochet period, when </p><p>they were both academic social scientists prominent in the opposition. They argue that conflict and tension have usually prevailed in U.S.-Chilean relations. Bilateral friendship has been elusive because of cultural and </p><p>diplomatic rivalries, economic conflict, U.S. interventionism and?during the Pinochet years?because Chile contravened the basic values of U.S. </p><p>This content downloaded from 185.2.32.58 on Sun, 15 Jun 2014 04:42:17 AMAll use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions</p><p>http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp</p><p>Article Contentsp. 170</p><p>Issue Table of ContentsForeign Affairs, Vol. 70, No. 3 (Summer, 1991), pp. 1-194Front MatterThe China Problem [pp. 1-16]Yugoslavia: Prospects for Stability [pp. 17-35]The New Arabia [pp. 36-49]Kurdish Independence and Russian Expansion [pp. 50-54]Moscow and the Gulf War [pp. 55-76]America's Stake in the Soviet Future [pp. 77-97]The Caribbean in the 21st Century [pp. 98-114]Population Change and National Security [pp. 115-131]The Roots of American Power [pp. 132-149]Comment and CorrespondenceWar Powers [pp. 150-154]</p><p>Book Review EssayReview: Rethinking Foreign Economic Policy [pp. 155-160]</p><p>Recent Books on International RelationsGeneral: Political and LegalReview: untitled [p. 161-161]Review: untitled [p. 161-161]Review: untitled [p. 161-161]Review: untitled [p. 162-162]Review: untitled [p. 162-162]</p><p>General: Military, Scientific and TechnologicalReview: untitled [p. 162-162]Review: untitled [p. 162-162]Review: untitled [p. 163-163]Review: untitled [p. 163-163]Review: untitled [p. 163-163]Review: untitled [p. 163-163]Review: untitled [p. 164-164]</p><p>General: Economic and SocialReview: untitled [p. 164-164]Review: untitled [pp. 164-165]Review: untitled [p. 165-165]Review: untitled [p. 165-165]Review: untitled [p. 165-165]Review: untitled [pp. 165-166]Review: untitled [p. 166-166]Review: untitled [pp. 166-167]</p><p>The United StatesReview: untitled [p. 167-167]Review: untitled [pp. 167-168]Review: untitled [p. 168-168]Review: untitled [pp. 168-169]Review: untitled [p. 169-169]Review: untitled [p. 169-169]Review: untitled [p. 169-169]Review: untitled [pp. 169-170]Review: untitled [p. 170-170]Review: untitled [p. 170-170]</p><p>The Western HemisphereReview: untitled [p. 170-170]Review: untitled [pp. 170-171]Review: untitled [p. 171-171]Review: untitled [p. 171-171]</p><p>Western EuropeReview: untitled [pp. 171-172]Review: untitled [p. 172-172]Review: untitled [p. 172-172]Review: untitled [p. 172-172]Review: untitled [pp. 172-173]Review: untitled [p. 173-173]</p><p>The Soviet Union and Eastern EuropeReview: untitled [pp. 173-174]Review: untitled [p. 174-174]Review: untitled [p. 174-174]Review: untitled [p. 174-174]Review: untitled [p. 175-175]Review: untitled [p. 175-175]Review: untitled [p. 175-175]Review: untitled [p. 175-175]Review: untitled [pp. 175-176]Review: untitled [p. 176-176]Review: untitled [p. 176-176]Review: untitled [p. 176-176]Review: untitled [pp. 176-177]Review: untitled [p. 177-177]Review: untitled [p. 177-177]Review: untitled [pp. 177-178]Review: untitled [p. 178-178]Review: untitled [p. 178-178]</p><p>The Middle EastReview: untitled [p. 178-178]Review: untitled [p. 179-179]Review: untitled [p. 179-179]Review: untitled [p. 179-179]Review: untitled [pp. 179-180]Review: untitled [p. 180-180]Review: untitled [p. 180-180]Review: untitled [pp. 180-181]Review: untitled [p. 181-181]Review: untitled [p. 181-181]Review: untitled [p. 181-181]</p><p>Asia and the PacificReview: untitled [pp. 181-182]Review: untitled [p. 182-182]Review: untitled [p. 182-182]Review: untitled [p. 183-183]Review: untitled [p. 183-183]</p><p>AfricaReview: untitled [pp. 183-184]Review: untitled [p. 184-184]Review: untitled [p. 184-184]Review: untitled [p. 184-184]Review: untitled [p. 185-185]Review: untitled [p. 185-185]</p><p>Source Material [pp. 186-193]Back Matter</p></li></ul>