Business Circle Magazine Vol.1 Issue 2 (Preview)

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Business Circle Magazine Vol.1 Issue 2 (Preview)

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  • March 2013 - bcmagz.com

    Vol.1 Issue 2

    1

    CONTENT

    CONTENTSENTREPRENEUR PROFILE

    TIPS TO TEST

    CHALLENGE YOURSELF 3 A JOURNEY TO BE A TECHNOLOGY TYCOON

    15 HE WHO BUILT THE FAME OF APPLE

    3 MANAGEMENT CLUES OF RAPID GROWTH

    10 KEYS TO BE SUPERIOR IN SOFTWARE INDUSTRY, T.O. GROUP

    21 TO WIN MASTER FRANCHISE LICENSE

    25 VALUES: YOUR DRIVING FORCE

    33 BUSINESS MYTHS

    35 15 BRAINTEASERS TO TEST

    YOUR MENTAL SHARPNESS

    36 SUDOKU

    37 IQ TEST

    3 21 15 117

    BUSINESS CASE STUDIES15 FOREIGN INVESTMENT CASE STUDY: TRI ASIA GROUP

    17 THE SNAP LOOK AT SOFTWARE BUSINESS

  • Article Contribution or Feedbacks: Mr. Phy NidonaTel: +855 12 584 666Email: p.nidona@bcmagz.com

    Advertisement Sale: Miss. Yan SopheaTel: +855 17 878 178Email: y.sophea@bcmagz.com

    Business Circle Magazines Office:Address: Unit C, Bldg. 58A, St. 310, Boeng Keng Kang 3, Chamkamorn, Phnom PenhTel: +855 23 555 2835Email: info@bcmagz.com Website: www.bcmagz.com

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    ADVERTISE WITH USWould like to place/book your ads with us?

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    March 2013 - bcmagz.com

    Vol.1 Issue 2

    2

    COMPANY PROFILE

    BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

    11 ONE VILLAGE ONE PRODUCT

    23 FRANCHISE OPPORTUNITY: GLORIA JEANS COFFEES

    25 FRANCHISE OPPORTUNITY: CHATIME

    27 LISTING OF BUSINESS ASSETS FOR SALE

    28 ASSETS OF CHARCOAL BBQ AND SOUP BUFFET FOR SALE

    29 ASSETS OF BLITZ BAR FOR SALE

    30 ASSETS OF PARKWAY SUPER BOWL FOR SALE

    31 USD30,000 FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES FOR SMES

    39 ZUCCHINI SPONGE INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY41 E-BIZ TUESDAY

    ADVERTISE WITH US

    T E A MEditor-in-ChiefMr. Phy Nidona

    Head of TechnicalMr. Seang Dara

    Admin & AccountantMiss. Lim Siv Eng

    Head of MarketingMr. Hem Sopanha

    DistributorMr. Seang Dara

    Senior Marketing Executive

    Miss.Yan Sophea

    Designer Mr. Roniel Dionco

    Photographer Mr. Roniel Dionco

    Mr. Chhuon SophornEditors

    Ms. Moeun SakanaMr. Heng Vicheth

    Copy Editors

    Ms. Kristin OConnell

    Mr. Roswell ThomasMr.Sam Thomas

  • March 2013 - bcmagz.com

    Vol.1 Issue 2

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    ENTERPRENEUR PROFILE

    A Journey to Be a Technology TycoonWritten by: Chhuon Sophorn

    Ever heard the term ANANA? You may then think of something related to computers. Sok Channda, 56, is the businesswoman behind this business name. She is the President and CEO of ANANA Group, comprising ANANA Com-puter, AngkorNet and MekongNet.

    Born in Kampong Cham, Ms. Channda entered business in 1983, only a few years after Cambodias reemergence. With $20 in start-up capital, she decided to rent a place next to a hairstyling salon and set up a business providing face massage for women. In her free time, Ms. Channda also honed her clothes knitting skills. She said that it took her from a few days to a week to finish one complete set of clothes. Those knitted clothes were sold at a local mar-ket, where she got the chance to see other types of Khmer traditional clothes, which in turn inspired her designs.

    Early in her career, Ms. Channda be-gan looking for strategies to optimize her business. She realized that if she was able to use machine to embroider, she could make a more diverse range of products more quickly than before. She then went on the tutorial to sharpen her skill. As her operations grew, Ms. Chan-nda hired relatives and other employees to help.

    Ms. Channda continued to look for new business opportunities. After some obser-vation in the market, she realized that no artificial flowers for Christmas decora-tion, although they were already success-ful products in Vietnam and Thailand. Ms. Channda brought some Christmas flowers from Vietnam and sold them wholesale to other retailers in the local market. However, without her own store,

  • her profits were limited. This factor led her to establish her own stand in the market in order to sell Christmas flowers both wholesale and retail.

    Ms. Channda began manufacturing her own flowers. She still remembers the de-signs, and tells this part of the story hold-ing scissors and cutting blank pieces of paper into various designs. In time, she expanded her flower sales to the provinc-es, and even began exporting to Vietnam, the country where she learned about the product in the first place. In time, her business became profitable.

    However, Ms. Channdas profits brought a challenge that is surprising for all first-time businesspeople: accounting. Ms. Channda soon had many records of ex-penses, revenues, and customers debts which became less and less accessible, to the point where sometimes she could not even locate the names of her debtors. Ms. Channdas fateful introduction to com-puters actually came from one of her cus-tomers, who mentioned that she might use the new machines to more efficiently track revenues. Ms. Channda points to this moment in 1993 as the starting point of her technology business.

    In 1993, Ms. Channda bought a compu-ter in 1993 and took a weeklong course there before returning with her new ma-chine to Cambodia. She pursued her com-puter studies in a local computer school, and brought her own computer to learn. It was during her computer studies that Ms. Channda won her first computer cus-tomer. The new computer she was using caught the attention of the school princi-pal, who asked her about the price. Ms. Channdas computer had cost $1,150, much less than the local price. The prin-

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    ENTERPRENEUR PROFILE

    A Journey to Be a Technology Tycoon

    cipal asked her to get more for the school.

    Ms. Channdas first computer order was for four machines; she imported them from Vietnam and made a profit of about $100 on each. Just $5 to $ 10 in profit from flower selling already made me hap-py, so with $100 profit from selling computer, I was even pleased to get, recalls Ms. Channda, smiling. With a newly discovered profit stream and $3,500 in capital from her flower business, Ms. Channda decided to open a computer retail outlet. Her op-eration started small in fact, her first store was in her computer teaching school. Due to financial constraints, Ms. Channda could buy only a few com-puters at a time. However, she was able to build a good relationship with her supplier and, eventually, she had a line of credit which allowed her greater flexibility.

    From the start, Ms. Channdas computer business took a bold approach to HR. Although her budget was small, she dared to employ two staff members with computer knowledge, paying each up to $800 per month. It was a very high salary back then, says Ms. Channda, but she explains that it was worth it for workers who knew the customers and could pro-vide expert computer advice and maintenance. If they can help generate profit, I am not afraid to pay them high salaries , says Ms. Channda.

    Up to this point, she had only imported compters that had already been fully assembled and set up at a cost to Ms. Channda of $100. As she had done with the flower business, when she moved from sell-ing flowers to designing them herself, Ms. Channda came up with the idea to expand her business to

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    ENTERPRENEUR PROFILEcapture a larger part of the value chain. Ms. Channda decided to buy spare parts and in-stalled them at her place, thereby reducing costs and increasing margins.

    The transition was not totally smooth and there was confusion over which computer parts to order. However, Ms. Channda learned from her mistakes and improved with each batch of computers. In 1995, Ms. Channda created the ANANA brand for this business.

    Again, in 2005, Ms. Channda felt restless to capture more of the computer value chain. She saw the growth in demand for computers slowing, causing her profits to fall. Ms. Chan-nda identified Internet service as an attrac-tive complementary product for computers. Ms. Channda started the Internet and VoIP pro-vider AngkorNet, then a joint venture with a Singaporean company in which ANANA held a 60 percent share.

    After one year, Ms. Channda started to look to online gaming and TV, which AngkorNet at the time would be unable to support. Ms. Chan-ndas new goal was fiber optic technology, one that was not shared by her business partner in AngkorNet, who did not agree on the proposal. My business partners were only interested in providing the service to the end user. They re-alized that it was costly to run the fiber optic service, explains Ms. Channda.

    Ms. Channda believed fiber optic technology would work at the large-scale in Cambodia and decided to open another company, MekongNet, this time on her own. However, this later firm had no conflict to the former one as MakongNet was aimed at building sites or Internet in fra-structures, told Ms. Channda. As the demand increased, MekongNet gained market share and returned good profit. She then turned to buy the remaining 40 percent share in Ang-korNet from her partner, making her the sole owner of three companies: ANANA Computer, AngkorNet and MekongNet.

    Along with the success she is having today, Ms. Channda also reflected on some interest-ing failures. For a short time, she established two other branches of ANANA, a bookshop and

    a supermarket. She disclosed that because she did not have enough staff or a proper system to control these two newly created businesses, they did not go smoothly. She raised a case of ANANA supermarket where she had caught a number of shoplifters. In