Composing Using Chords & Harmony

  • Published on
    11-Dec-2015

  • View
    28

  • Download
    7

Embed Size (px)

DESCRIPTION

gcse comp

Transcript

<p>How To Make Chords More Interesting</p> <p>Composing techniquesThere are SO MANY:</p> <p> Chord progressions The use of pedal notes/drones Balanced phrases within melodic writing The use of riffs and ostinatos The use of dotted rhythms, triplets and syncopation Tonality: major / minor / modal / pentatonic Techniques specific to a musical period or style, i.e. Club Dance, Waltz Sequence Imitation Call and response Modulation Use of major, minor and dominant seventh.Intended OutcomesutcomesALL MUST: Understand what the PRIMARY and SECONDARY chords are</p> <p>SOME SHOULD: Understand how to compose a chord progression using PRIMARY and SECONDARY chords</p> <p>SOME COULD: Understand how to harmonise a melody with appropriate PRIMARY and SECONDARY chords.Chords &amp; HarmonyYou can either START with a set of chords and write your melody afterwards</p> <p>OR.</p> <p>Write your melody and ADD your chords afterwardsStarting with chords and adding a melody afterwards.Decide on a key or scale (notes you will use in your piece).Assume we choose C major for this. It uses all the white notes from C C. </p> <p>C D E F G A B C</p> <p>2. Work out what the chords are for each note of the scale. </p> <p>C D E F G A B C E F G A B C D G A B C D E F </p> <p>Starting with chords and adding a melody afterwards.3. Find the PRIMARY chords (chords 1, 4 &amp; 5)</p> <p>C D E F G A B C E F G A B C D G A B C D E F These are usually always MAJOR chords (in a major key)Starting with chords and adding a melody afterwards.6</p> <p>4. Find the SECONDARY chords (chords 2, 3 &amp; 6)</p> <p>C D E F G A B C E F G A B C D G A B C D E F These are usually always MINOR chords (in a major key) and they add SPICE AND FLAVOUR!Starting with chords and adding a melody afterwards.75. Create a set of chords (4 is a good number) from these </p> <p>C D E F G A E F G A B C G A B C D E </p> <p>C DmEmFGAm Starting with chords and adding a melody afterwards.85. Use the notes in the chords to create a simple melody which changes with the chords. </p> <p>C E F G E G AB G B C D</p> <p>C EmFG Starting with chords and adding a melody afterwards.95. Create a set of chords (4 is a good number) from these </p> <p>C E F G E G AB G B C D</p> <p>C EmFG Starting with chords and adding a melody afterwards.10Starting with a MELODY and adding chords afterwardsMake sure your melody has a key and you have used notes from the key to compose your melody</p> <p>We will assume you have used C major for this all the white notes from C C.Starting with a MELODY and adding chords afterwardsWrite your melody, making sure it starts and ends on the tonic (first note of the key):</p> <p> C G A F G A B C E C D B C C Starting with a MELODY and adding chords afterwards2. Check what the PRIMARY and SECONDARY chords are for your key:</p> <p>Starting with a MELODY and adding chords afterwards3. Look at the notes of your melody and match them with the notes of your chords. Play them to check they fit together.</p> <p> C G A F G A B C E C D B C C </p> <p>Starting with a MELODY and adding chords afterwards</p> <p> C G A F G A B C E C D B C C </p> <p>15How To Make Chords More InterestingAnd Impress The Examiner</p> <p>Basic ChordsHere are the chords added to the melody</p> <p>C chord =C E GG chord =G B DF chord =F A CG7 chord =G B D F</p> <p>Varying the accompanimentInstead of chords try creating a single note bass-line</p> <p>This is a good idea to use but on its own it is very boringTry using it at the same time as another accompanimentTry varying the rhythm</p> <p>Bass lineTry using the other notes of the chords to vary your single note bass-line</p> <p>E.g. C chord is made up of the notes C E and G</p> <p>C chord = notes C E GG chord =G B DF chord =F A CG chord =G B DF= F A CG= GBDFC chord =C E G</p> <p>Developing the basic chordsOnce you have worked out the basic chords there are many ways of changing them to make them more interesting</p> <p>Broken ChordsBreak up the chords so that the notes are played one at a time instead of all at once</p> <p>Try breaking them up in different directions- ascending and descending</p> <p>AscendingDescending</p> <p>Chord InversionsIf you like the sound of block chords try varying the order of the notes to make them more interesting</p> <p>GECECGCGEECGCGECECGCECGDBGGDBCAFFCADBGGDBCAFFDBG</p> <p>Varying the RhythmDotted rhythms make the accompaniment more interesting</p> <p>Because the rhythm of the melody is different to the rhythm of the accompaniment we call this a cross-rhythm</p> <p>Pedal NoteA long, low, sustained note is called a pedal note</p> <p>Try adding a pedal note underneath the chords</p> <p>Arranging chords and a pedal note on one staveCondensing the pedal note onto the same stave as the chords look like this</p> <p>Altering the rhythmTry changing the rhythm of the accompaniment to triplets </p> <p>This creates more cross-rhythms</p> <p>Changing the broken chords</p> <p>If you change the broken chords to semiquaver (quarter) notes the accompaniment sounds much busier and more detail can be added to them</p> <p>Try varying the direction of the notes (ascending, descending, mixed)AscendingDescendingMixedSemiquaver AccompanimentHere is an example of a semiquaver accompaniment using ascending, descending and mixed patterns</p>

Recommended

View more >