Crocodiles of the Worldby Wataru Kimura; Hajime Fukada

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<ul><li><p>Crocodiles of the World by Wataru Kimura; Hajime FukadaReview by: Robert E. GordonCopeia, Vol. 1967, No. 1 (Mar. 20, 1967), pp. 253-254Published by: American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists (ASIH)Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1442224 .Accessed: 04/12/2014 20:28</p><p>Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms &amp; Conditions of Use, available at .http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp</p><p> .JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range ofcontent in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new formsof scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org.</p><p> .</p><p>American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists (ASIH) is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize,preserve and extend access to Copeia.</p><p>http://www.jstor.org </p><p>This content downloaded from 169.230.243.252 on Thu, 4 Dec 2014 20:28:52 PMAll use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions</p><p>http://www.jstor.org/action/showPublisher?publisherCode=asihhttp://www.jstor.org/stable/1442224?origin=JSTOR-pdfhttp://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsphttp://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp</p></li><li><p>REVIEWS AND COMMENTS REVIEWS AND COMMENTS REVIEWS AND COMMENTS </p><p>author says [in translation] "Our purpose was to present an integrated outline of the phylogeny, taxonomy, and other aspects of the lower land vertebrates." The book is approved by the "Ministry of Higher and Secondary Specialized Education as a text- book for university students." </p><p>SYSTEMATICS OF THE SALAMANDER GENUS GYRINOPHILUS. By Ronald A. Brandon. 1966. University of Illinois Press, Urbana. 86 pp., 23 figs., 1 table. Price $5.50. -This book provides ". . . a complete re- examination of specimens and literature in an attempt to interpret and integrate exist- ing materials into a factual taxonomic under- standing of this genus of plethodontid sala- manders." The author examined all avail- able collections: about 950 transformed speci- mens, 500 branchiate forms and an undis- closed number of live animals. Specimens were obtained from most regions of the geographic range of this hard-to-collect group. The survey of the literature is also comprehensive. The author deserves much praise for his efforts and industry in produc- ing this generally well written report. This type of study is much needed for many herpetological groups. </p><p>The several characters studied (number of trunk vertebrae, ventral pigmentation, shapes and numbers of pre- and para-vomerine teeth, and numbers of premaxillary and maxillary teeth) showed little geographic variation. The genus is consolidated into two species: Gyrinophilus porphyriticus with four subspecies (porphyriticus, duryi, danielsi, and dunni) and the neotenic G. palleucus with three subspecies (palleucus, necturoides, and gutolineatus). The justification for the retention of subspecies is gallantly presented but is feeble. </p><p>Information dealing with many important facets of the biology of these cryptic and interesting salamanders is still lacking, e.g., details of life history, population dynamics, and observations on the influence of environ- mental factors on growth and development. Although there are numerous records of cavernicolous populations of G. porphyriti- cus, one wonders what specimens of this species would be like phenotypically if they were reared in caves, or if both species were reared for a few generations under similar laboratory conditions. These are the kinds of basic questions that must be answered before </p><p>author says [in translation] "Our purpose was to present an integrated outline of the phylogeny, taxonomy, and other aspects of the lower land vertebrates." The book is approved by the "Ministry of Higher and Secondary Specialized Education as a text- book for university students." </p><p>SYSTEMATICS OF THE SALAMANDER GENUS GYRINOPHILUS. By Ronald A. Brandon. 1966. University of Illinois Press, Urbana. 86 pp., 23 figs., 1 table. Price $5.50. -This book provides ". . . a complete re- examination of specimens and literature in an attempt to interpret and integrate exist- ing materials into a factual taxonomic under- standing of this genus of plethodontid sala- manders." The author examined all avail- able collections: about 950 transformed speci- mens, 500 branchiate forms and an undis- closed number of live animals. Specimens were obtained from most regions of the geographic range of this hard-to-collect group. The survey of the literature is also comprehensive. The author deserves much praise for his efforts and industry in produc- ing this generally well written report. This type of study is much needed for many herpetological groups. </p><p>The several characters studied (number of trunk vertebrae, ventral pigmentation, shapes and numbers of pre- and para-vomerine teeth, and numbers of premaxillary and maxillary teeth) showed little geographic variation. The genus is consolidated into two species: Gyrinophilus porphyriticus with four subspecies (porphyriticus, duryi, danielsi, and dunni) and the neotenic G. palleucus with three subspecies (palleucus, necturoides, and gutolineatus). The justification for the retention of subspecies is gallantly presented but is feeble. </p><p>Information dealing with many important facets of the biology of these cryptic and interesting salamanders is still lacking, e.g., details of life history, population dynamics, and observations on the influence of environ- mental factors on growth and development. Although there are numerous records of cavernicolous populations of G. porphyriti- cus, one wonders what specimens of this species would be like phenotypically if they were reared in caves, or if both species were reared for a few generations under similar laboratory conditions. These are the kinds of basic questions that must be answered before </p><p>author says [in translation] "Our purpose was to present an integrated outline of the phylogeny, taxonomy, and other aspects of the lower land vertebrates." The book is approved by the "Ministry of Higher and Secondary Specialized Education as a text- book for university students." </p><p>SYSTEMATICS OF THE SALAMANDER GENUS GYRINOPHILUS. By Ronald A. Brandon. 1966. University of Illinois Press, Urbana. 86 pp., 23 figs., 1 table. Price $5.50. -This book provides ". . . a complete re- examination of specimens and literature in an attempt to interpret and integrate exist- ing materials into a factual taxonomic under- standing of this genus of plethodontid sala- manders." The author examined all avail- able collections: about 950 transformed speci- mens, 500 branchiate forms and an undis- closed number of live animals. Specimens were obtained from most regions of the geographic range of this hard-to-collect group. The survey of the literature is also comprehensive. The author deserves much praise for his efforts and industry in produc- ing this generally well written report. This type of study is much needed for many herpetological groups. </p><p>The several characters studied (number of trunk vertebrae, ventral pigmentation, shapes and numbers of pre- and para-vomerine teeth, and numbers of premaxillary and maxillary teeth) showed little geographic variation. The genus is consolidated into two species: Gyrinophilus porphyriticus with four subspecies (porphyriticus, duryi, danielsi, and dunni) and the neotenic G. palleucus with three subspecies (palleucus, necturoides, and gutolineatus). The justification for the retention of subspecies is gallantly presented but is feeble. </p><p>Information dealing with many important facets of the biology of these cryptic and interesting salamanders is still lacking, e.g., details of life history, population dynamics, and observations on the influence of environ- mental factors on growth and development. Although there are numerous records of cavernicolous populations of G. porphyriti- cus, one wonders what specimens of this species would be like phenotypically if they were reared in caves, or if both species were reared for a few generations under similar laboratory conditions. These are the kinds of basic questions that must be answered before </p><p>the significance of the geographic variation in salamanders can be more fully appreciated. </p><p>This book is earnestly recommended for all serious students of herpetology. It whets the appetite for further investigation.- BERNARD S. MARTOF, Department of Zoology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina. </p><p>CROCODILES OF THE WORLD. By Wataru Kimura and Hajime Fukada. Pub- lished by the Atagawa Crocodile Vivarium, Atagawa, Higashi-Izu, Kamo-gun, Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan, 1966. 127 pp., 42 illustra- tions; cloth bound in slip case.-This limited edition (500 copies), published 1 April 1966 and not for general sale, contains a treat- ment of the Order Crocodilia written in Japanese. The work constitutes an effort on the part of the authors to standarize the Japanese names of the crocodilians for zoos and aquaria in Japan and to provide basic information regarding the group. Thus, the book was distributed to appropriate institu- tions in Japan and a few copies have been sent abroad. A revised edition for general sale may appear in a few years. </p><p>The book is divided into three parts. Part 1 (four chapters) consists of a general in- troduction to the group; a list of included taxa with scientific, English, German, and Japanese common names and a brief state- ment of geographic range; a discussion of Tomistoma mackikanense, the first fossil </p><p>(Pleistocene) crocodile found in Japan; and a discussion of the relation of crocodiles to man. The nomenclature follows that of Wermuth and Mertens. </p><p>Part 2 contains seven chapters devoted to reproduction, growth, feeding habits in nature, feeding in captivity, construction of vivarium tanks, observations on keeping alli- gators as pets, and a survey of diseases of crocodiles and their treatment. Much of this information is original, stemming from the experiences of the senior author who is director and owner of the Atagawa Crocodile Vivarium. The junior author is Professor of Zoology at Kyoto Kyoiku University. </p><p>Part 3 (3 chapters) includes short synopses of the higher taxa, and keys to the families, genera, and species. Brief accounts of the 16 monotypic and 5 polytypic species follow. Sixteen species are illustrated by photo- graphs of living individuals; three species </p><p>the significance of the geographic variation in salamanders can be more fully appreciated. </p><p>This book is earnestly recommended for all serious students of herpetology. It whets the appetite for further investigation.- BERNARD S. MARTOF, Department of Zoology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina. </p><p>CROCODILES OF THE WORLD. By Wataru Kimura and Hajime Fukada. Pub- lished by the Atagawa Crocodile Vivarium, Atagawa, Higashi-Izu, Kamo-gun, Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan, 1966. 127 pp., 42 illustra- tions; cloth bound in slip case.-This limited edition (500 copies), published 1 April 1966 and not for general sale, contains a treat- ment of the Order Crocodilia written in Japanese. The work constitutes an effort on the part of the authors to standarize the Japanese names of the crocodilians for zoos and aquaria in Japan and to provide basic information regarding the group. Thus, the book was distributed to appropriate institu- tions in Japan and a few copies have been sent abroad. A revised edition for general sale may appear in a few years. </p><p>The book is divided into three parts. Part 1 (four chapters) consists of a general in- troduction to the group; a list of included taxa with scientific, English, German, and Japanese common names and a brief state- ment of geographic range; a discussion of Tomistoma mackikanense, the first fossil </p><p>(Pleistocene) crocodile found in Japan; and a discussion of the relation of crocodiles to man. The nomenclature follows that of Wermuth and Mertens. </p><p>Part 2 contains seven chapters devoted to reproduction, growth, feeding habits in nature, feeding in captivity, construction of vivarium tanks, observations on keeping alli- gators as pets, and a survey of diseases of crocodiles and their treatment. Much of this information is original, stemming from the experiences of the senior author who is director and owner of the Atagawa Crocodile Vivarium. The junior author is Professor of Zoology at Kyoto Kyoiku University. </p><p>Part 3 (3 chapters) includes short synopses of the higher taxa, and keys to the families, genera, and species. Brief accounts of the 16 monotypic and 5 polytypic species follow. Sixteen species are illustrated by photo- graphs of living individuals; three species </p><p>the significance of the geographic variation in salamanders can be more fully appreciated. </p><p>This book is earnestly recommended for all serious students of herpetology. It whets the appetite for further investigation.- BERNARD S. MARTOF, Department of Zoology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina. </p><p>CROCODILES OF THE WORLD. By Wataru Kimura and Hajime Fukada. Pub- lished by the Atagawa Crocodile Vivarium, Atagawa, Higashi-Izu, Kamo-gun, Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan, 1966. 127 pp., 42 illustra- tions; cloth bound in slip case.-This limited edition (500 copies), published 1 April 1966 and not for general sale, contains a treat- ment of the Order Crocodilia written in Japanese. The work constitutes an effort on the part of the authors to standarize the Japanese names of the crocodilians for zoos and aquaria in Japan and to provide basic information regarding the group. Thus, the book was distributed to appropriate institu- tions in Japan and a few copies have been sent abroad. A revised edition for general sale may appear in a few years. </p><p>The book is divided into three parts. Part 1 (four chapters) consists of a general in- troduction to the group; a list of included taxa with scientific, English, German, and Japanese common names and a brief state- ment of geographic range; a discussion of Tomistoma mackikanense, the first fossil </p><p>(Pleistocene) crocodile found in Japan; and a discussion of the relation of crocodiles to man. The nomenclature follows that of Wermuth and Mertens. </p><p>Part 2 contains seven chapters devoted to reproduction, growth, feeding habits in nature, feeding in captivity, construction of vivarium tanks, observations on keeping alli- gators as pets, and a survey of diseases of crocodiles and their treatment. Much of this information is original, stemming from the experiences of the senior author who is director and owner of the Atagawa Crocodile Vivarium. The junior author is Professor of Zoology at Kyoto Kyoiku University. </p><p>Part 3 (3 chapters) includes short synopses of the higher taxa, and keys to the families, genera, and species. Brief accounts of the 16 monotypic and 5 polytypic species follow. Sixteen species are illustrated by photo- graphs of living individ...</p></li></ul>