LIV.— African Heriadine Bees

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  • This article was downloaded by: [University of Auckland Library]On: 05 December 2014, At: 15:38Publisher: Taylor & FrancisInforma Ltd Registered in England and Wales Registered Number:1072954 Registered office: Mortimer House, 37-41 MortimerStreet, London W1T 3JH, UK

    Annals and Magazine ofNatural History: Series11Publication details, including instructionsfor authors and subscription information:http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/tnah17

    LIV.African HeriadineBeesT.D.A. CockerellPublished online: 13 Aug 2009.

    To cite this article: T.D.A. Cockerell (1946) LIV.African Heriadine Bees ,Annals and Magazine of Natural History: Series 11, 13:104, 550-567, DOI:10.1080/00222934608654577

    To link to this article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00222934608654577

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  • 550 Mr. T. D. A. Coekerell on

    7.7 (6.5) ; rostrum (incisive alveolus to front of orbit) 4.1 ; zygomatic breadth 11.9 (11) ; breadth of brain-ease at posterior root of zygoma 9.1 (8.5) ; height of brain-case from auditory bulla 9.6 (8.8) ; interorbital breadth 4-8 (5) ; breadth across m3-m a 8.1 (7.9); upper tooth row c-m a 6.2 (6); length of mandible 12.9 (12.2); breadth across canines 6.2 (6).

    Remarks. This striking discovery, which I am pleased to name for Mrs. Cansdale, is obviously a distinct West African representative of G. superba of the eastern Belgian Congo. Its distinguishing features are very well marked, but in view of a tendency towards variability in the much simpler pattern in another species of the genus noted by the present author (1946) it is thought best to give the Gold Coast form subspecifie status ~t present. Mr. Cansdale is to be congratulated on the addition of such a remarkable hat to the Gold Coast fauna. He informs me (in litt.) that the animal was found alive on the ground and brought in by natives, to none of whom was it previously known. In the absence of any field observations on the animal itself the significance of such a pattern remains to be explained.

    HEFERENCES. HA~AN, R. W. 1939. " T w o new Mammals f rom the Belgian

    Congo." Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist . (11), iii. pp. 219-224. 1946. " A new Scotonycteris, with Notes on other Gold Coast

    Bats ." Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist. (11), xii. pp. 766-775.

    L I V . - - A f r i c a n Heriadine Bees. By T. D. A. COC~E~]~LL.

    W~E~ i first began to describe African Heriades I received a letter from Dr. Hans Brauns, warning me that they were numerous and di~cult . The species described by him do not emphasize this opinion, because he selected those which had conspicuous distinctive characters. Now, after working on these bees for many years, I can well agree with Dr. Brauns, and hope that, with field observations and long series, a future student will adequately revise my work. My impression is that the species are considerably more numerous than I have recognized, but if I have failed to separate some of them, no great harm has been done,

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  • African Heriadine Bees. 551

    There has been a difference of opinion concerning the gender of the name Heriages (by scrim amended to Eriades). Thinking to settle the matter, I consulted an expert Greek and Latin scholar, and he informed me that Heriades could be masculine, feminine, or neuter. He did not mention any other alternative.

    Heriade8 ambiguu~, sp. n.

    ( type).--Length about 5-Smm. ; resembling H. 8cutellatus Friese (specimen from Zululand, received from Fricse, compared), but that species has much longer antennm, narrower face, and wings not dusky apically. Also, our species is without axillary spines.

    Black, including mandibles, antennm, tegut~e and legs ; hair of head and thorax white, long and dense on clypeus and sides of face, very thin on thorax above, not forming bands before or behind mesonotum ; head approximately circular seen from in front ; antennae short for a male ; vertex strongly punctured; mesonotum and scutellum shining; area o f metathorax a very narrow channel; wings faintly dusky, the apical region with a weak cloud ; first recurrent nervure joining second submarginal cell a considerable distance from base; legs with much white hair; first two tergites with white hair-bands (on first entire, but considerably broadened at sides), third with no band, fourth with short bands at sides; apical tergites hoary with thin hair.

    ~.--Length about 6 ram. ; margin of clypeus practically simple ; ventral scopa white ; wings distinctly dusky (but in one specimen clear) ; mesonotum and scutellum shining; axillse not spined; sides of face with white hair.

    Nata l : Greytown, Oct. 20, 1931 (J. Ogilvie). One female collected by L. Ogilvie.

    This cannot be H. mandibularis Friese, described from Howiek, Natal, as the female mandibles are quite ordinary, bidentate at end, and the male antennm are short, nob nearly reaching the metanotum.

    Heriades tenuissimus, sp. n.

    O.--Length about 5"5 mm. ; similar to H. ambiguus Ckll., but smaller and more slender ; axillae not spirted ; -central scopa white ; wings hyaline, with the apical half

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  • 552 Mr. T. D. A. Cockerell on

    perceptibly dusky ; first recurrent nervure ending about as far from base of second submarginal cell as second from apex ; sides of face with dense pure white hair ; supra- clypeal area polished; eyes very dark brown; clypeal margin with two pairs of nodules, separated by a broad, somewhat concave, interval ; mandibles, antennm, tegul~e and legs black ; mesonotum polished between the coarse punctures; anterior face of first tergite not sharply margined; abdominal hair-bands slender, white, very distinct on the shining fourth and fifth tergites.

    Iqatal: Greytown, Oct. 20, 1945 (J. Ogilvie). The general appearance is like that of H. wellmani Ckll. H. globiventris Friese differs by the clear wings, and the more robust form, with a larger head. The peculiar clypeal margin is distinctive. The mandibles of H. tenuissimus have an apical tooth or angle, and a very oblique cutting-edge, but the mandible is not elongated, with a long apical tooth, as in H. mandibularis Friese.

    Halictus cyclodontus, sp. n.

    ~.--Length about 5.6 ram. ; aspect of H. tenuissimus Ckll. and H. wellmani Ckll. ; black, including mandibles, antennm and legs ; flagellum rather long and slender for a female ; eyes brown ; head approximately circular seen from in front ; sides of face not densely hairy ; clypeal margin with a series of similar, prominent nodules (style of H. speculiferus Cldl.) ; mandibles broad at end, with two ve ry obtuse, rounded tee th ; mesonotum coarsely punctured, it and the scutellum shining ; axillm unarmed ; wings hyaline; first recurrent nervure joining second submarginal cell near base ; first tergite with conspicuous bands at sides only; second not banded, third to fifth with distinct entire bands ; ventral scopa white.

    Natal : Greytown, Oct. 20, 1931 (Alice Mac]tie). Very like H. elliatus Friese, which I have considered to be identical with H. wellmani Ckll., but that species, as described by Friese, has a long head, with a long face, and yellowish ventral scopa.

    Two males, with the same data, collected by A. Mackie and L. Ogilvie, appear to belong here. They are about 4.5 ram. long, and very closely resemble H. matopensis Ckll., but the axillm are unarmed. The orbits do not converge below. The mandibles are tridentate, the

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  • African Heriadine Bees. 553

    apical tooth long and sharp, the second very short and rounded (as in the female), the third more pointed.

    Heriades nasiferus, sp. n.

    ~.--Length about 6.7 ram. ; black, including antennae, mandibles, tegulee and legs ; pubescence scanty, white, no distinct patches on face, hairs fringing scutellum very long; head oblong; clypeus minutely denticulate on margin, but in middle with a prominence, which in lateral view appears as a small snout ; mandibles long, bidentatc at end, with a deep channel ending between the teeth, and the two keels below this, very close together ; at the outer side of base of each mandible is a strong triangular prominence ; mesonotum and scutellum shining ; base of metathorax with a narrow channel; wings dusky ; the recurrent nervures joining second submarginal cell very near base and apex ; abdomen with thin indistinct hair- bands ; ventral scopa white ; no axillary spines.

    Natal : National Park, l~Iarch 3-15, 1932 (Alice Mac]tie). By the clypeal prominence, this resembles the much larger H. braunsi Ckll. and H. mamilliferus Brauns.

    Heriades trinodosus, sp. n.

    ~.--Length about 5-3 mm. ; narrow, black, including antennm, mandibles, tegul~e and legs ; hair of head and thorax scanty, white, conspicuous on sides of face; clypeus exposed, dull, the lower margin with three large shining nodules, the middle one smallest; mandibles unidentate ; mesonotum coarsely punctured, it and the scutellum shining ; wings hyaline, slightly greyish apically ; first recurrent nervure ending near base of second sub- marginal cell ; axillm unarmed ; abdomen with widely interrupted hair=bands on first two tergites, entire, conspicuous ones on third and fourth, an interrupted one on fifth ; ventral scopa white.

    Natal : Greytown, Oct. 20, 1931 (Alice Maclcie). By the clypeal structure this falls with H. civicus Ckll., from which it is known by the clear wings and banded abdomen.

    H. civicus was described from Cape Town. The general appearance is exactly as in H. tenuissimus

    Ckll. and t t . weIlmani Ckll. The latter species has the clypeal margin obscurely nodulose, with a brilliantly shining spot on each side next to eye ; the wings are clear

    Ann. & May. 5[. Hist. Set. 11 Vol, xiii, 39

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  • 554 Mr. T. D. A. Cockerell on

    Heriades heterognathus, sp. n. ~.--Length about 6.5 mm. ; black, including mandibles,

    antennm and legs ; head approximately circular seen from n front; front and sides of face with long pale hair,

    rather thin and inconspicuous, but in oblique view it is more distinct ; lower margin of elypeus forming a broad arch, with a moderate elevation on each side ; mandibles thick, very coarsely striate, with the upper keel turning upward and ending a considerable distance from the base of the mandible; mesonotum and scutellum polished, with large punctures ; median groove of mesonotum very distinct ; a slender shining band at base of metathorax ; wings hyaline; second submarginal cell receiving first recurrent nervure very near base ; ventral seopa apparently white, but so loaded with orange pollen that the colour cannot be distinctly seen; abdomen with narrow white bands on the margins of the tergites. The axillse are spirted, and the eyes are brown.

    Nata l : Greytown, Oct. 20, 1931 (Alice Mackie). A male, supposed to belong to this species, is distinguished by its clear wings, first recurrent nervure very near base of second submarginal cell, polished mesonotum, five entire white hair-bands on abdomen, those on tergites 4 and 5 very distinct ; eyes dark brown. This has the same data, except that it was collected by L. Ogilvie. This species may be compared with H. globiventris Friese, but the elypeus is different, and the face is broader. The male has the abdominal bands much more distinct.

    Heriades arcuatus, sp. n.

    ~.--Length about 7 ram. ; black, including mandibles, antennm and legs; head approximately circular, seen from in front ; sides of clypeus, except upper part, with thin white hair ; between clypeus and eyes, and extending part way up front, is a broad triangle of dense pure white hair; upper part of clypeus shining black, contrasting with the hairy supraclypeal area; margin of clypeus broadly arched or concave, with a prominent nodule at each side ; mandibles with the cutting-edge very oblique, and the two keels parallel ; front dull, but a shining area on each side of ocelli; mesonotum dull, seen from in front, but the posterior part is shining between the large punctures; scutellum highly polished; area of recta,-

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  • African Heriadine Bees. 555

    thorax with a shining r im; tegulm black; wings moderately dusky, not at all reddish ; second submarginal cell long, receiving first recurrent nervure about twice as far from base as second from apex ; ventral scopa dense, pure white; abdomen with slender white bands on tergites 1 to 5, that on first broadly interrupted. A noticeable feature is that the tongue is creamy white. The axillm are spirted.

    Nata l : Greytown, Oct. 20, 1931 (Alioe Maclcie). Two males with strongly dusky wings are presumed to belong to this species. The locality and data are the same, but one was collected by J. Ogilvie, the other by L. Ogflvie. The third to fifth tergites are without hair-bands, and the first sternite is simple, with a tuft of hairs. The antennae reach as far as the tegulte.

    This species and H. heterognathus are remarkable for having the margin of the clypeus similar to that of the North American H. carinatus Cresson and H. cruciferus Ckll. H. arcuatus may be compared with H. seutellatus Fr...