PreMedLife Magazine - July/August 2012 Issue

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PreMedLife is the #1 national online magazine for premed student featuring content that has anything and everything that has to do with getting accepted into medical school, what medical school is like, and more!

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  • PREMEDLIFEJULY/AUGUST 2012THE MAGAZINE FOR PREMEDICAL STUDENTS

    New med school begins recruitment p.10|AAMC offers new MCAT tool p.10|Space medicine anyone?p.11

    How to Retake theMCAT the Smart Way

    Tips From a Student Who Mastered the MCAT the Second Time Around

    Life After Medical School in the Caribbean

    A Closer Look at WhatHappens Post Graduation

    The Medical SchoolAdmissions Guide

    An Excerpt from a Harvard MDs Week-by-Week Handbook

    +FAST-GROWING CAREERS FORMEDICAL SCHOOLGRADUATESPLUS...WHAT THE HECK DO I SAY?Advice on Tackling the Personal Statement

    ESPECIALLY THIS SPECIALITY: A CLOSER LOOK INTO THE CAREER OF AN ORTHOPAEDIC SURGEON

    6Several non-clinical career options arebecoming more popular among doctors

  • exclusive content, contests & giveaways, reader polls, & more...LIKE US on Facebook atfacebook.com/premedlife

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  • July/August 2012 | PreMedLife Magazine | 3

    FEATURES 6 Fast-Growing (Non-Clinical) CareersFor Medical School Graduates | 14An increasing number of medical school graduatesare choosing an alternate to traditional medicine

    What the Heck Do I Say?| 36Tips and advice for tackling the personal statement

    Life After Attending Medical School in the Caribbean| 40Ever wonder what life is like after attending and graduating from medical school in the Caribbean?

    DEPARTMENTSSchool Spotlight| 35The University of Illinois at Chicago offers a uniqueprogram for students interested in urban medicine

    Especially This Specialty | 45Find out what being an Orthopaedic Surgeon is all about and what it will take to become one

    IN EVERY ISSUENewsbites| 8Relevant news & information for students applying to medical school

    The Goods| 46Gadgets & gizmos to keep you entertained.Check out our picks for this issue

    In The Stacks| 49Books to inspire you or provide you with advice along your journey to medical school

    Better Life, Better You| 50Advice & tips for taking care of yourself tomake it through your hectic pre-med life

    IN THIS ISSUEMedical School: The Third Year| 26What to expect in the third year of medical schooland how to excel during this time

    Book Excerpt: The Medical SchoolAdmissions Guide | 30A Harvard MDs week-by-week admissions handbookfor preparing and getting into medical school

    Retaking the MCAT the Smart Way | 39A student who retook the MCAT shares strategies foracing the MCAT the second time around

    CONTENTS14 10

    51

    40

    July/August 2012www.premedlife.com

    LIKE USPreMedLife magazine provides a host offeatures, everything from getting intomedical school to tips for acing theMCAT. Visit our facebook page often toget online exclusive articles covering top-ics that pre-med students care about most.

    Facebook.com/PreMedLife

    BEST OF BOTH WORLDS - Check outThe Goods where youll find Warm orCool Face Mugs and more!p.45

  • HERES HOW TO REACH US...Kisho Media, LLC P.O. Box 7049New York, NY 10116Main Office (347) 231 - 6429

    HAVE A STORY IDEA?Email us at info@premedlife.com

    WANT TO SUBSCRIBE?Log onto www.premedlife.com and sign-up to receivean email with the latest issue is available online

    INTERESTED IN ADVERTISING ORPARTNERING WITH PREMEDLIFE?Email us at info@premedlife.com

    PreMedLife magazine is published six times per year by KishoMedia, LLC. and copies are provided to select colleges and uni-versities free of charge. The information in PreMedLife maga-zine is believed to be accurate, but in some instances, may rep-resent opinion or judgment. Consult your pre-med advisorwith any questions you may have about the medical schooladmissions process and related topics. Unless otherwise noted,all photographs, artwork, and images may not be duplicated orreprinted without express written permission from KishoMedia, LLC. PreMedLife magazine and Kisho Media, LLC. arenot liable for typographical or production errors or the accura-cy of information provided by advertisers. PreMedLifeMagazine reserves the right to refuse any advertising. Allinquires may be sent to: Kisho Media, LLC. P.O. Box 7049,New York, NY 10116. To reach us by phone call (347) 231-6429 or email us at info@premedlife.com.

    4 | PreMedLife Magazine | July/August 2012

    from the

    One of the most satisfying aspects of working as the publisher of PreMedLife magazine is hearing from premeds about what theyre doing to fulfill their dreams ofbecoming a doctor. The determination and passion in their voices when they speakabout wanting to practice medicine makes me at times want go to medical school. Thepoint is - in the name of becoming a doctor, these premeds are making the choice tobe successful.

    It is always a choice to be successful or not and not everyone will reach theirgoals.The ones that do make it though are the ones who will reap the rewards of theirhard labor. The road to getting into medical school is not easy, but the decisions youmake along the way can make the journey a little easier. From the decisions you makein your personal life to the decisions you make in your academic life, it all boils downto the choices that youll make along the way.

    It may sound so cliche but the power is truly all in your hands. You cant blameanyone else for your failures or mistakes - you have to take ownership of what hap-pens in your life. So as you make your way through this think called your premedlife, let your end goal motivate your to keep pushing forward. A single bad decisioncan jeopardize your dream so stay focused and make sure every decision you makeis the best one!

    Sheema PrincePublishertprince@premedlife.com

    SShheeeemmaa

    publisherPublisher/CEO | Sheema Prince

    Executive Director/COO | Jonathan Pearson

    EVP, Operations | Monique Terc

    Executive Editor | Njeri McKenzie

    Managing Editor | Monica Lee

    Digital Editor | Donald Gibbons

    Contributing Writers | Mike Frazier, MD,Bonnie Mason, MD, Jeffery Mazique, MD,Sahil Mehta, MD, Suzanne M. Miller

    Production Coordinator | Shawn Klein

    Social Media Manager | Tammy Li

    Interns | Gonathan J. Breedlove, Nancy Buckley,Diana Kozak, Natalia Prieto, Seantasia Twiggs

    Find us on Twitter @premedlifeFind us on Facebook.com/premedlife

    PREMEDLIFEthe lifestyle magazine for premedical students

    www.premedlife.com

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  • PreMedLifeMagazine

    twitter.com/premedlife facebook.com/premedlife

    SubscribeToday

    For more information about PreMedLife MMagazine, visit us online at www.premedlife.com

  • 6 | PreMedLife Magazine | July/August 2012

    Diana AltamiranoPost Baccalaureate @ Georgia Gwinnett CollegeDiana is a non-traditional studentwith a business degree. She is cur-rently taking science classes as apre-med post-baccalaureate student.

    Tamara EdginBiology @ University of ArkansasCommunity College at BatesvilleTamara is currently workingtowards an associates degree andplans to transfer to Lyon College,a four-year university.

    Jaime GarciaInternational Economics @ University ofWashingtonJamie is the first in his family toattend college. He has gained experi-ence in the medical field and is cur-rently an emergency room volunteer.

    Ola HadayaMiddle Eastern Studies @ RutgersUniversity, New BrunswickOla is a 17-year-old student who isin the process of applying to medicalschool. She speaks 3 languages.

    Chesha HayterBiomedical @ Southern OregonUniversityChesha is a non-traditional studentand a mother, who after starting hereducation later in life has learnedmany things.

    Hillary LeeNeural Science @ New York UniversityHillary will start on the pre-medtract in Fall 2012. She says her tran-sition from Missouri is an experi-ence she can share to help otherslike herself.

    Alexandra MassaNeuroscience @ Stonehill CollegeAlexandra is currently a volunteer ather local hospitals emergency depart-ment. She is interested in providingcare to third-world countries whereaccess to medical supplies are limited.

    Linda MukumbutaBiology & Public Health @ Universityof Texas, San AntonioLinda is a 19-year-old junior who iscurrently affiliated with 4 pre-medorganizations. She says a career inmedicine is truly her calling in life.

    Touria RguigBiochemistry @ University ofTexas, AustinTouria is a honors student whospeaks 6 languages. Shes also anauthor on a research paper publishedin Synthetic Metals Journal.

    Will SmithPost Baccalaureate @ California StateUniversity, SacramentoWill is a non-traditional pre-medstudent with a degree in compara-tive religion. He has worked as anER tech.

    Chandler StisherBiology @ University of Texas, AustinChandler is the first in his family toattend a 4-year university and hashad aspirations of becoming a doc-tor since he was 11 years old.

    Marina ZeledonBiology @ Potsdam State UniversityMarina likes to read, research, andtalk about medical school journeyswith current doctors. She is on herschools equestrian team and has astrong passion to become a doctor.

    THE PREMEDLIFE MAGAZINE STUDENT ADVISORYBOARD IS AN EXEMPLARY GROUP OF PREMED STU-DENTS from a variety of backgrounds who have a widerange of accomplishments. They will help keep usinformed about what we need to know to makePreMedLife magazine the go-to resource for aspiringdoctors. If you have any questions for any of our board mem-bers email us at info@premedlife.com >>>

    studentstudentadadvisorvisoryyboardboard

    Tiffany Que-SmithArt & Design @ San Jose State UniversityTiffany is a non-traditional studentwho translates her thoughts into artwhich luckily for her, is extremelyhelpful when studying.

    THE TWEET PEEK

    FOLLOW US ON TWITTER.COM@PREMEDLIFE

    FOR DAILY UPDATESLIKE THESE

    GOOD READSAre Osteopathic (DOs)

    Physicians Real Doctors?http://huff.to/Jv4lCf via

    @docmalerba for HuffPost

    INFO ALERT Are Osteopathic (DOs)

    Physicians Real Doctors?http://huff.to/Jv4lCf via

    @docmalerba for HuffPost

    MCAT NEWSWhat if new MDs were

    required to work for free?Starting next year NY willrequire unpaid work from

    new lawyershttp://nyti.ms/KFgTK6

    VICTORY CLIMBPremed ask @salon's @cary-

    tennis for advice "I some-times wonder if medicine ismy plan B pretending to be

    my plan A"http://bit.ly/IGRxcJ

    AMERICAS DOCTORSHarvard and MIT to Offer

    Free Online Courseshttp://bit.ly/IzMv0T

    PERSEVERANCEApplying to #medschool this

    year? You be in a strongerposition if you submit yourapplication early! #premed

    RE-APPLICANT FILESFilling out the courseworksection of your #AMCASapp? Watch our video on

    entering basic coursework:http://ow.ly/aEXfq (More

    videos too!)

  • PREMEDLIFECAMPUSEDITIONWant a unique leadership opportunity to add to your medical school application?

    Now you can apply to beCEO/Editor-in-Chief of thePreMedLife Campus Edition atyour school.

    WHO: You

    WHAT: As CEO/Editor-in-Chief,you are talked with putting togeth-er a staff, producing content, andpublicizing your edition on campus- running your own online maga-zine that is a part of thePreMedLife network.

    WHERE: Your high school, college,or university.

    WHEN: The application deadlinefor Fall 2012 launches is August 6

    WHY: Running your own campusedition of PreMedLife magazinewill provide you with a uniqueleadership opportunity that willsurly help you stand out from therest of the crowd.

    FOR MORE INFORMATION www.premedlife.com Start Campus EditionDeadline for our FALL 2012 LAUNCH

    AUGUST 6TH

  • 8 | PreMedLife Magazine | July/August 2012

    NEWSBITES>>> Recent news & information relevant to students applying to medical school

    'Lecture-less' Medical School Classes?Two professors from Stanford say that it is time tochange the way doctors are taught, according to anarticle published in the May 3 issue of the NewEngland Journal of Medicine.

    "Since the hours available in a day have notincreased to accommodate the expanded medicalcanon, we have only one realistic alternative: makebetter use of our students' time," the authorswrote. "We believe that medical education can beimproved without increasing the time it takes toearn a medical degree, if we make lessons "stickier"(more comprehensible and memorable) andembrace a learning strategy that is self-paced andmastery-based and boosts engagement."

    The professors make a radical suggestion tomove traditional lectures outside of the classroomand use class time for more "active" learning.They believe that in an era with a perfect video-delivery platform students would be wasting theirclass time sitting through a lecture. Instead, theysay that the classroom model should be flipped towhere students absorb an instructor's lecture in adigital format as homework, which would free upclass time for a focus on applications, includingemotion-provoking simulation exercises."Students would welcome more opportunities forcase-based, problem-based, and team-based exer-cises - strategies that activate prior knowledge,"they wrote. "Teachers would be able to actuallyteach, rather than merely make speeches.

    The professors use the example of the KhanAcademy to make the case that a 'lecture-less"model would indeed be effective. The KhanAcademy, a non-profit organization that offersonline video lessons and exercises on elementaryand high school topics, allows students to gainproficiency in core academic concepts at theirown pace. The professors say that if such a modellike one that the Khan Academy uses wereapplied to medical school, class time would befreed up for what they call "higher-order" andmore interactive lessons.

    One school already trying out this model isStanford Medical school where the core biochem-istry course did away with the standard lecture-based format and adopted one similar to theKhan Academy. Under this structure, class timewas used for interactive discussions of clinicalvignettes highlighting the biochemical bases ofvarious diseases. According to the authors, theresults were significant. Not only did the propor-tion of student course reviews that were positiveincreases substantially from the previous year, thepercentage of students who attended class shot

    up from about 30% to 80% - even though classattendance was optional.

    In their article the professors present a scenario:Imagine first-year medical students learning criticalbiochemical pathways by watching short videos asmany times as necessary in the comfort of theirpersonal learning space. Knowledge acquisition isverified by repeated low-stakes quizzes. Then, in

    class, the students participate in a discussion thatincludes a child with a metabolic disease, his or herparents, the treating clinicians, and the biochem-istry professor. The relevant biochemistry - so dryon the page of a textbook - comes to life. The les-son sticks. "That's the vision we want to chase: edu-cation that wrings more value out of the unyieldingasset of time," the authors concluded.

    Two Stanford University professors say that it is time to change the way future doctors are taught andthey say getting rid of traditional medical school lectures will make lessons stickier for students

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  • 10 | PreMedLife Magazine | July/August 2012

    NEWSBITES

    For students in the market for a DO degree,Marian University's College of OsteopathicMedicine (MU-COM) has received the officialokay to begin recruiting students for its fall2012 inaugural class.

    The school will be Indiana's first new medicalsch...