QUÉBEC’S EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM FOR CHILDCARE SERVICES ?· quÉbec’s educational program for childcare services update. quÉbec’s educational program for childcare services update. research and writing

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<ul><li><p>QUBECS EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM FOR CHILDCARE SERVICESUPDATE</p></li><li><p>QUBECS EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM FOR CHILDCARE SERVICESUPDATE</p></li><li><p>Research and writingVronique Forest, Colette Lanthier,Micheline Nelissen and Jose RoyDirection gnrale des politiques Ministre de la Famille et des Ans</p><p>Collaboration in writingRmy Charest, free-lance contributor</p><p>Sabin TremblayDirection gnrale des politiquesMinistre de la Famille et des Ans</p><p>Advisory CommitteeMarie-Hlne Bertrand, teacherCgep de Saint-JrmeAssociation des enseignantes et enseignants en Techniques dducation lenfance</p><p>Thrse Bichara and Johanne KingsburyAssociation des garderies prives du Qubec</p><p>Nathalie Bigras, professorDpartement dducation et de pdagogieUniversit du Qubec Montral</p><p>Marie Brosseau, educational advisorCPE Brin de foin</p><p>Claire-Marie Dionne, psychoeducatorCLSC Saint-MichelAssociation des CLSC et des CHSLD du Qubec</p><p>Julie Gosselin, professorcole de radaptation, Facult de mdecineUniversit de Montral</p><p>Hlne-Linda Gravel, executive directorCPE La Douce CouveConseil qubcois des services de garde ducatifs lenfance</p><p>Rene Harrison, home childcare providerCPE Lle des moussaillonsAssociation des ducatrices et ducateurs en milieu familial du Qubec</p><p>Jean-Pierre HouleAgence des services la familleMinistre de la Famille et des Ans</p><p>Genevive Issalys, Sylvie Melsbach and Pierre PrvostAssociation qubcoise des centres de la petite enfance</p><p>Genevive Pomerleau, educational advisorCPE Franquette la grenouille</p><p>Yolande VzinaComit des conseillers et conseillres aux services la familledes directions territoriales sur le programme ducatifAgence des services la familleMinistre de la Famille et des Ans</p><p>Reading CommitteeCaroline Bouchard, professorUniversit du Qubec Montral</p><p>Louise Bourgon, teacher - Earlychildhood education techniquesCgep douard-Montpetit</p><p>Lucie Champagne, psychologistInstructor at childcare centres </p><p>Francine FerlandCHU Sainte-Justine</p><p>Micheline Lalonde-Graton, retired professorUniversit du Qubec Montral</p><p>Carole Lavalle, teacher - Earlychildhood education techniquesCgep du Vieux Montral</p><p>Jean-Marc Lopez, directorCPE La trottinette carotte</p><p>Jean-Marie Miron, professorDpartement des sciences de lducationUniversit du Qubec Trois-Rivires</p><p>Jacques NaudUniversit du Qubec en Abitibi-Tmiscamingue</p><p>Francine SinclairUniversit du Qubec en Outaouais</p><p>PublishingDirection des relations publiques et des communicationsMinistre de la Famille et des Ans</p><p>Ministre de la Famille et des Ans425, rue Saint-Amable, Qubec (Qubec) G1R 4Z1600, rue Fullum, Montral (Qubec) H2K 4S7</p><p>Telephone numbers:Qubec region: 418 643-4721</p><p>Elsewhere in Qubec: 1 888 643-4721</p><p>E-mail: info@mfa.gouv.qc.ca</p><p>The document may be consulted under thePublications heading of the Family section of the web sitewww.mfa.gouv.qc.ca.</p><p>Legal Deposit 2007Bibliothque et Archives nationales du QubecLibrary and Archives CanadaISBN: 978-2-550-51556-2 (PDF)</p></li><li><p>Messagefrom the Minister</p><p>I am proud to present the update to the educational programentitled Meeting Early Childhood Needs and intendedfor all childcare establishments of Qubec. Children are ourmost precious asset. It is vital that we ensure their harmo-nious development in an environment that is both safe andstimulating. The content of this document clearly under-scores this point. In addition to reiterating the importanceof offering each child high-quality services, this programprovides for the putting in place of activities fostering thechilds global development and social skills.</p><p>It has been ten years since the first educational programwas published. The evolution of the family and society, the development of knowledge related to children, thedevelop ment of the childcare establishment network andrecent legislative amendments have guided the revision ofthis program.</p><p>This document is the result of a close partnership callingon the expertise of individuals working in various activityfields. I would like to thank all those people who have contributed to it.</p><p>All the discussions surrounding the writing of this documentwere motivated by a common objective: that of offeringchildren the best possible chances of developing in a context of fun and learning.</p><p>It is my hope that together, we will continue our collabora-tion to offer the children of Qubec a highly stimulating andenriching environment.</p><p>Michelle CourchesneMinister of Families</p></li><li><p>Table of contents</p><p>3</p><p>Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5</p><p>PART 1 REFERENCE FRAMEWORK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7</p><p>1 Supporting the Quality of Educational Childcare Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7</p><p>1.1 Objectives of educational childcare services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8</p><p>1.2 Objectives of the educational program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9</p><p>2 Theoretical Foundations of the Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11</p><p>2.1 Ecological approach or the importance of the interaction between the child and his or her environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12</p><p>2.2 Attachment theory or the importance of establishing a meaningful relationship between the adult and the child . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14</p><p>3 Basic Principles of the Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16</p><p>3.1 Each child is unique . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17</p><p>3.2 Children are the primary agents of their development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18</p><p>3.3 Child development is a comprehensive, integrated process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19</p><p>3.4 Children learn through play . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20</p><p>3.5 Cooperation between childcare personnel or home childcare providers and parents is essential for the harmonious development of the child . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21</p><p>4 Development of the Whole Child . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23</p><p>4.1 Emotional dimension . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24</p><p>4.2 Physical and motor dimension . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25</p><p>4.3 Social and moral dimension . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26</p><p>4.4 Cognitive dimension . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27</p><p>4.5 Language dimension . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28</p><p>Table of contents</p></li><li><p>Table of contents4</p><p>PART 2 APPLICATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31</p><p>5 Educational intervention . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32</p><p>5.1 Observation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33</p><p>5.2 Planning and organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34</p><p>5.3 Intervention . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35</p><p>5.4 Reflection and feedback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36</p><p>5.5 Intervention styles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37</p><p>6 Structuring of activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39</p><p>6.1 Routine and transitional activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40</p><p>6.2 Play periods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46</p><p>7 Structuring of the premises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54</p><p>7.1 Layout of the premises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..54</p><p>7.2 Play materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62</p><p>8 Relationship with parents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68</p><p>Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71</p><p>Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73</p><p>Appendices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81 </p></li><li><p>Introduction 5</p><p>In Qubec, educational childcare services have a threefoldmission: that of seeing to the well-being, health and safetyof the children entrusted to them, that of offering childrenan environment likely to stimulate their development at alllevels, from birth to school, and finally, that of preventingthe subsequent appearance of learning, behavioural orsocial integration problems.</p><p>Three types of settings offer these services: childcarecentres, day care centres and home childcare operations.In childcare centres and day care centres, children areoften grouped by age, although the number of multi-agegroups is growing, whereas in home childcare operations,groups are mainly made up of children of different ages.However, whatever their method of grouping, all childcareestablishments are subject to the Educational ChildcareAct and its regulation.1 This legal framework stipulates theminimum guidelines for ensuring the quality of services,i.e. it describes the obligations of the individuals who offerthese services: educators and home childcare providers,as well as the various standards that must be met,whether in terms of staff training, children/educator ratio,pedagogical support or other issues.</p><p>Regardless of whether childcare services are offered inchildcare centres, day care centres or home childcareoperations, all childcare services must notably:</p><p>apply an educational program comprising activitieswhich seek to:</p><p>1 foster childrens overall development, particularly theiremotional, social, moral, cognitive, language, physicaland motor development;</p><p>2 help children to gradually adapt to life in society and tointegrate harmoniously.</p><p>The educational program also includes promotional andpreventive services aimed at providing an environment conducive to the development of a healthy lifestyle,healthy eating habits and behaviour that have a positiveeffect on childrens health and well-being.2</p><p>Published for the first time in 1997,3 the EducationalProgram for Child Care Centres has been revised andenriched in order to better support childcare personneland home childcare providers in their work with childrenand to help them update their role in a context that hasundergone several changes in recent years.</p><p>Introduction</p></li><li><p>Introduction6</p><p>Over the years, Qubec families have undergone a number of transformations whichhave impacted the development of children. As a general rule, women are having theirchildren later in life than they did in the past, a very large majority of women remain inthe work market even when their children are under five years of age, and fathers aremore present. More than one in two children now attends a childcare establishmentbefore entering school,4 and an ever-growing number of children come from one-childfamilies, which explains the greater importance of the socialization mission ofchildcare establishments. Several children will experience a parental separation, a transi-tion period, followed by a family recomposition and various types of childcare arrange-ments and some will have to adapt to the birth of a half-brother or a half-sister. Todaysfamily trajectories are increasingly diversified and childcare establishments must takenote of this reality.5</p><p>At the social level, our lifestyle is becoming increasingly passive: more time spentwatching television and on the computer, increase in the consumption of junk food, lesstime devoted to physical activity and consequently, a rise in weight-related problems,even among children, which explains the greater importance that children acquirehealthy lifestyles early on, both at home and in a childcare setting. Moreover, duenotably to the omnipresence of advertising, the incentive to consume is also becomingincreasingly pronounced, making it all the more difficult, and consequently all the moreimportant, for todays children to learn how to delay the satisfaction of their desires.</p><p>Knowledge related to child development has also progressed enormously in the lastten years. Examples include knowledge on the development of the brain and knowledgerelated to learning. Through the educational program, educational childcare establish-ments must also be well versed in this new knowledge and take it into account in theirday-to-day operations.</p><p>Finally, major changes have also taken place in the educational childcare environmentin recent years: rapid increase in the number of subsidized spaces; holding and publicationof the Grandir en qualit6 survey, which made it possible to identify the networksstrengths and weaknesses and which provides numerous avenues for the on-goingimprovement of its quality; passage of the Educational Childcare Act followed by its...</p></li></ul>