History of IT industry, Internet and Hacker Culture

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We will discuss history of IT industry. Internet and Hacker Culture.

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IT

History of IT industry Internet and Hackers

10/24/2013

hyoshiok@gmail.com http://d.hatena.ne.jp/hyoshiok/

twitter: @hyoshiok

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Be a Hacker Change the World Better

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The future is already here it's just not very evenly distributed.

by William Gibson

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Agenda

History of IT Industry, Internet and Hackers OSS Hacker Culture Community, Engineers career

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whoami

Name: Hiro Yoshioka Title: Technical Managing Officer Company: Rakuten, Inc 2009 present My mission: Empower Our Engineers Twitter: @hyoshiok http://d.hatena.ne.jp/hyoshiok (Diary in Japanese) http://someday-join-us.blogspot.jp/ (in English)

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whoami

Name: Hiro Yoshioka 2009-present, Rakuten 2000-2008, Miracle Linux, CTO 2002-2003, OSDL board member 1994-2000, Oracle 1984-1994, DEC 1984 Keio University (MS) I have one patch to Linux Kernel J x86: cache pollution aware patch 2006/6/23, 2.6.18 http://git.kernel.org/cgit/linux/kernel/git/torvalds/linux.git/commit/?id=c22ce143d15eb288543fe9873e1c5ac1c01b69a1

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Who are we?

l Rakuten, Inc. l Internet services company l Founded : Feb. 7th 1997, Tokyo, Japan l The first service: Rakuten Ichiba (shopping mall)

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Who are we?

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Rakuten in Japan

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Agenda

History of IT Industry OSS Hacker Culture Community, Engineers career

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IT industry

Vertical Integration by 80s Horizontal from 80s Open Systems Internet, 90s Open Source Software from

1998 Web 2.0, 2005

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Internet Age

Collaboration with somebody OSS (Open Source Software) Wikipedia Facebook, twitter Community Youtube 2ch

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Blog SNS Cost of finding people becomes

all most zero.

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Free software

GNU project, 1985 Linux, 1991 Ruby, 1993 Open Source Software, 1998

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GNU Project

Distributed by Magnetic Tapes you send money to FSF FSF send you a tape (lately

CDROM) Not bazaar model

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Internet

Xmosaic 1993 Windows 95 1995 Open Source Netscape 1998

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OSS Open Source Software

OSS and Free Software 1998, Opened Netscapes

browser source code Open Source Software

Free Software: Freedom is important

OSS: Not only freedom

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OSS

Value Freedom of Software Global software development model

Evolution of software by collaboration

Cathedral and Bazaar Eric Raymond, 1997

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Bazaar

Software Development Model Engagement

Users become Developers Develop by Community

individual vs. organization volunteers

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Hacker Culture

Common Value

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Hacker Ethics

Sharing Openness Decentraization Free access to computers World improvement Levy, Steven. (1984, 2001). Hackers: Heroes of

the Computer Revolution (updated edition). Penguin. http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/729

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Hacker Ethics

Access to computersand anything which might teach you something about the way the world worksshould be unlimited and total. Always yield to the Hands-On Imperative!

All information should be free Mistrust authority promote decentralization Hackers should be judged by their hacking, not

criteria such as degrees, age, race, sex, or position You can create art and beauty on a computer Computers can change your life for the better

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Hacker Culture, Common Value

Computers can change your life for the better rough consensus and working code

http://www.ietf.org/tao.html Its better to ask forgiveness than permission.

If it's a good idea, go ahead and do it. It is much easier to apologize than it is to get permission. By Grace Hopper

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Internet, Joichi Ito The ethos of the Internet

everyone should have the freedom to connect, to innovate, to program, without asking permission.

No one can know the whole of the network, and by design it cannot be centrally controlled.

This network was intended to be decentralized, its assets widely distributed. Today most innovation springs from small groups at its edges.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/06/science/joichi-ito-innovating-by-the-seat-of-our-pants.html?_r=2&

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What Happened to Yahoo, Paul Graham In 1998. Yahoo had two problems Google

didn't: easy money, and ambivalence about being a technology company.

Which companies need to have a hacker-centric culture? Any company that needs to have good

software.

http://www.paulgraham.com/yahoo.html

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What Happened to Yahoo, Paul Graham Good programmers want to work at hacker-

centric culture. Without good programmers you wont get good

software. http://www.paulgraham.com/yahoo.html

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The Hacker Way (Facebook) IPO 2012

Code wins arguments Continuous Improvement and Iteration Open and Meritocratic Hackathon Bootcamp http://www.wired.com/business/2012/02/zuck-

letter/

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http://blogs-images.forbes.com/jasonoberholtzer/files/2011/06/Talent_traffic.gif

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Hacker-centric Culture Software Development in Internet Age

Hire good programmers Good programmers want to work with

good programmers at hacker centric culture

Build good work place Good programmers make good services

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Web 2.0 Software products vs Internet Services

http://oreilly.com/web2/archive/what-is-web-20.html 9/30/2005

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Web_2.0_Map.svg

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Netscape vs Google A native web application, never sold or

packaged, but delivered as a service None of the trappings of the old software

industry are present. No scheduled software releases, just continuous

improvement. No licensing or sale, just usage. No porting to different platforms, , just a

massively scalable collection of commodity PCs running OSS operating systems plus homegrown applications and utilities that no one outside the company ever gets to see.

http://oreilly.com/web2/archive/what-is-web-20.html

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Community

Seminar, meetings, conference,

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IT Seminar Calendar of Japan

http://bit.ly/QmRFiS more than 300 meetings/month

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Conferences in Japan

http://ll.jus.or.jp/2013/ http://phpcon.php.gr.jp/w/2012/ http://yapcasia.org/2013/ http://2012.pycon.jp/index.html http://nodefest.jp/2012/ http://rubykaigi.org/2013

http://connpass.com/event/2253/?disp_content=presentation#tabs

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Conference

Running by volunteers Inexpensive, e.g., 5000 yen/day ($50/day) Numbers attendees; more than 100 - 1000 Sharing technical knowledge and networking Beer Bash or Drinking Party (optional) Examples, LL event, PHP Conference, YAPC (Yet

another perl conference), RubyKaigi, Tokyo Node Gakuen (Javascript)

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cf. Commercial Conference

Running by corporation Expensive, e.g., $300-$500/day Numbers attendees; more than 1000 Sharing technical knowledge and networking Party (optional) Examples, OSCON $2045 (5 days),

http://www.oscon.com/oscon2013

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Volunteer driven meetups, conference

Good Points Organizer; You can organize what you want.

Contents, speakers, date, time, place, fee Presenters; You can share your idea. Participants;

Bad Points You need to do everything. (You may have help

from community)

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Sustainable meetups, conference

Value of meetup > Cost of meetups Increase value Decrease cost

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Self Introduction

Ethnography a branch of anthropology dealing with the

scientific description of individual cultures.

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Ethnography, computer industry

Field study of Computer Industry instead of undeveloped region. Understand corporate culture Describe corporate culture Develop better corporate culture Corporate culture is difficult to understand

from outside

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Ethnography

The Soul of New Machine Show Stopper i-mode Engineering Culture Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution

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whoami

Name: Hiro Yoshioka 2009-present, Rakuten 2000-2008, Miracle Linux, CTO 2002-2003, OSDL board member 1994-2000, Oracle 1984-1994, DEC

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Digital Equipment Corporation

Corporate Culture The first company gives you strong

impressions Computer vendor, 2nd largest, 1957-90s Acquired by Compaq in 1998, merged with HP

in 2002

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Digital Equipment Corporation

Corporate Culture Midnight project internal computer network information sharing

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Hacker-centric Culture Why do we need it?

Common Good Competitiveness Best practice

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Hacker-centric Culture Why do we need it for me?

It is fun. Reasons

Common good (make better world) Competitiveness (win a competition) Best practice (increase productivity)

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How do we foster it? Corporate culture is developed by implicit and

explicit way Only insiders know it

Socialization

Externalization

Combination

Internalization

Tacit/ Tacit

Explicit

Explicit

TacitTacit

Explicit/ Explicit

Challenge of a Global Knowledge-Creating Organization

Socialization This process focuses tacit to tacit. Externalization This process focuses tacit to explicit. knowledge. Combination Knowledge transforms from explicit to explicit.Internalization Tacit knowledge is created using explicit knowledge and shared across the organization.

Knowledge needs to move from Tacit to Explicit and Explicit to Tacit This is especially hard for Global Companies!

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How do we foster it? Tacit (implicit) Knowledge

material: manager, mentor, colleagues methods: work, job, study sessions, lunch,

drinking, hackerthons, SNS, Explicit Knowledge

strategy, guideline, rule, procedure, tools

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How do we foster it? Tacit (implicit) Knowledge

Super Sale live on Enterprise SNS

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Corporate Community

Community of practice Organization: Vertical Project: Horizontal Community: Not Vertical, Not

Horizontal sharing value

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The Hacker Way (Facebook)

Code wins arguments Continuous Improvement and Iteration Open and Meritocratic Hackathon Bootcamp http://www.wired.com/business/2012/02/zuck-

letter/

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The Hacker Way (Facebook)

Hackathon Demo or Die Pizza and Beer

at Yammer, 10/28/12

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How to be a good Engineer (specialist)? Learn how to learn knowledge is less important than skill Be lifetime learner

http://learningpatterns.sfc.keio.ac.jp/

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Rakuten

Learning Global Experience Program International (oversea) Technical

Conference Hands on Trainings

Global trainingTraining is very important.

SF Agile Development Center DU members

SF Agile Development CentertrainingThe number of participants6employees Training period 25 Sep 2011 15 Dec 2011

Work and Life in San Francisco

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Famous steep hills are all around the city

Internal meeting in the house The local specialty Clam Chowder

Joined Linkshares Soccer Team

Robotics and AI meetup at San Francisco Univ.

Bayside view from Fisherman's Wharf

Project Meeting

SFADC office

Members desk

DUve promoted Globalization : GEP/OSC/Englishnization

GEP: 8 trainings, 28 trainees.OSC: 140 conferences, 468 members

2012 result

,17 countries.

As part of it, DADve helped GEP, OSC and EP program.

Last year, DU sent many people to overseas.

TrainingOne day hands-on

https://www.facebook.com/RakutenTech

Technical Trainings

Mary Poppendieck come to Japan in April. She developed Lean Software Development which like TOYOTA Production System(TPS).And she is known famous leader, consultant about software development in USA.

Leaders WorkshopTechnical Trainings

Janet Gregoryis the founder of DragonFire, Inc., an agile quality process consultancy and training rm. Her passion is helping teams build quality systems. Since 1998, she has worked as a coach and tester introducing agile practices into both large and small companies.

Software TestTechnical Trainings

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Community

Collaboration tools (Wiki, bug tracking system)

Techtalks Technology Conference

Socialization

Externalization

Combination

Internalization

Tacit/ Tacit ExplicitExplicit

TacitTacit

Explicit/ Explicit

Challenge of a Global Knowledge-Creating Organization

Socialization This process focuses tacit to tacit. Externalization This process focuses tacit to explicit. knowledge. Combination Knowledge transforms from explicit to explicit.Internalization Tacit knowledge is created using explicit knowledge and shared across the organization.

Knowledge needs to move from Tacit to Explicit and Explicit to Tacit (Nonaka, Takeuchi) This is especially hard for Global Companies!

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Enterprise SNS Tacit (implicit) Knowledge

Super Sale live on Enterprise SNS

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Tech Talk ?

Informal technical talks by experts, running by volunteer staffs

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Topics

Tips about internal tools Wiki, Network Tools, JIRA,

Confluence, git, New technologies

Mobile Applications, PaaS, agile software development, HTML5,

Many Tech Topics Big Data Agile CI

Change JIRA Cloud

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Rakuten Technology Conference Annual conference since 2007 by

Rakuten All sessions were in English (2012) industries experts and employees

sessions

Experts Sessions

Rakutens sessions & LT

Omotenashi Beautiful Cosplayer

http://tech.rakuten.co.jp/rtc2012

http://www.manaslink.com/rtc2012

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2013 web site

http://tech.rakuten.co.jp

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Oct 26th

October 2013

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keynote speakers

Matz

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keynote speakers

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Internet changes everything. The World is Flat. Open Source Software Bazaar Model Hacker Mind

http://www.rakuten.co.jp/recruit/engineer/hackermind.html

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Moores Law

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moore's_law

Computers are getting cheaper Transistor is double every 18 to 24 months

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The Mythical Man-Month

http://www.kobobooks.com/ebook/The-Mythical-Man-Month-Essays/book-5XViaJPL_UeFtLEagIcF9A/page1.html

Frederick Brooks, JR.Brooks Law "adding manpower to a late software project makes it later"

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Human Centric

Engineers make Services and Software. Computers are getting cheaper by

Moors law Software Development is governed

by Brookss law. Hackers make the Internet.

ENGLISHNIZATION

ITS ONLY ENGLISH

Employee Grade

Not Reached (RED)

Not Reached (YELLOW)

Not Reached (ORANGE)

ReachedTarget GREEN

AAA -550 551-650 651-749 750- AA -500 501-600 601-699 700- A -450 451-550 551-649 650- BBB -400 401-500 501-599 600- BB -400 401-500 501-599 600- B -400 401-500 501-599 600-

RED ZONE: More than 200 points away from target YELLOW ZONE: Between 100-199 points away from target ORANGE ZONE: Between 1 99 points away from target GREEN ZONE: Score...